0100 PREAMBLE

Indian Social Science Academy (ISSA) organizes Indian Social Science Congress (ISSC) every year with a view to discovering, developing and disseminating science of Nature-Human-Society through critical appraisal and integration of current research and theory in all subjects of science taught and researched in Indian Universities, Colleges, IITs, NITs, Regional Engineering Colleges, Medical Colleges, AIIMS, PGIs, NISERS, IISERS, CSIR, ICAR, ICPR, ICMR, ICSSR, ICHR and ICPR Institutes/Laboratories for making India and its peoples creative, self-reliant, prosperous and happy.

0200 HISTORY

First Indian Social Science Congress was held from February 15 to 17, 1976 at Allahabad. Since then it has been held at different universities, details of which are given on p 48. The 40th session of the Indian Social Science Congress was held from December 19-23, 2016 at University of Mysore, Mysuru and the 41st session of it was held from Dec 18 to 22, 2017 at Periyar University, Salem. . Each ISSC has a focal theme, details of which are given on p 48..
All subjects/disciplines of science of Nature-Humans-Society are represented in Indian Social Science Congress. There are 28 Research Committees and 21 Interdisciplinary Thematic Panels in it.
Science in Indian Social Science Congress is defined as social as it is the result of collective mental and physical labour. It is without any boundary and, is indivisible.
University Grants Commission recognizes Indian Social Science Congress on par with Indian Science Congress. Every session of Indian Social Science Congress has a focal theme.

0300 42nd INDIAN SOCIAL SCIENCE CONGRESS

The Indian Social Science Academy (ISSA) in association with Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha shall hold the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress be-tween December 27 and 31, 2018 at Bhubaneswar.

0400 FOCAL THEME

‘Human Future in Digital Era’ is the focal theme of the XLII Indian Social Science Congress. A note on it is given on pp 13-18.

0500 OBJECTIVES

The Indian Social Science Congress is a multidisciplinary national forum, which promotes integration of Science of Nature-Humans-Society through intra, inter and multi disciplinary appraisal of current research and theory. Its deliberations, therefore, relate to (a) the focal theme, (b) current research and theory in each subject/discipline of Science, (c) inter and multi-disciplinary deliberations on the major India’s and world’s problems; (d) emerging areas of research and (e) improving the quality of education and research through capacity building programmes for young scientists. Specific objectives related to the focal theme, ‘Human Future In Digital Era’ are as follows:
0301. To comprehend the science of digital technology/Information Technology. 0302. To determine status of development of digital technology in India.
0303. To explore the connections between digital technology and production & distribution.
0304. To investigate connection between digital technology and employment.
0305. To find out association between digital technology and education.
0306. To assess impact of digital technology on learning and creativity,
0307. To evaluate impact of digital technology on health of the general public.
0308. To determine the impact digital technology on social cohesion, peace, conflict, violence, rapes and murders.
0309. To ascertain centralizing, alienating, secularizing and/or communalizing effects of digital technology.
0310. To investigate relationship between digital technology and bio-diversity including ecology and envi-ronment.
0311. To assess power of digital technology in stopping extinction of species and saving the world from ex-tinction.
0312. To determine the power of digital technology in making the future of human better, safer and secure.
0313. To determine the power of digital technology for promoting slavery and destroying democracy.
0314. To investigate effects of Digital Technology/Information Technology/robotics on human personalities and human behavior.
0315 To explore effects of ‘Information overload’ on human thoughts, creativity, behavior and personality
0316Any other relevant to the understanding of the need, relevance and validity of Digital/Information Technology/Robotics..

0600 MAJOR THEMES of PLENARIES

Following may be considered as major sub-themes of the focal theme ‘Human Future In Digital Era’:
0501. Science and Technology of Digital Era.
0502. Politics and political implication of Digital Era.
0503. Connection between digital technology and economy.
0504. Impact of digital technology on employment and generation of new job opportunities.
0505. Impact of digital technology on Peoples Health.
0506. Impact of digital technology on education, learning and research.
0507. Impact of digital technology on removal of poverty and large scale undernourishment/ malnourishment.
0508. Digital Technology, social cohesion, social alienation and social violence.
0509. Biodiversity, ecology global warming and digital technology.
0510. Social Justice, crimes and digital technology.
0511. Digital technology, Democracy and the new forms of slavery.
0512. Role of digital technology in conflicts and war.
0513. Information overload And Human Behaviour.
0514 Virtual Learning And Real Learning
0515 e-governance and law-And-order.

0700 SEMINARS/SYMPOSIA/COLLOQUIA/WORKSHOP THEMES

  1. International
    1. Science of Real World Vs Science of Virtual World.
    2. Impact of digitization/information technology on World Economy and Peoples Economic condi-tions.
    3. Centralizing power of digital technology and sustainability of the Human on Planet Earth.
    4. Nuclearisation, Digitization and Annihilation of Human.
    5. Third World War
  2. National
    1. Status of indigenous Science and Technology.
    2. Status of Indigenous Digital Science and Technology.
    3. Impact of digital/information technology on Indian Economy.
    4. Impact of digital/information Technology on Indian Agriculture.
    5. Impact of digital Technology on Peoples quality of life and health.
    6. Impact of digital/information technology on School and University Education System.
    7. Digital Technology and Social Alienation.
    8. Digital Technology/Information Technology and Social Violence (rapes, murders).
    9. Digital Technology/Information Technology Democracy and Human Rights.
    10. Impact of Digital/Information Technology on Family, Community, Society and Culture.
    11. E-commerce, e-trading, GST, and Corporate Capital.
    12. Secularizing/Communalizing Effects of Digital/Information Technology.
    13. Cyber Crimes, Net-Neutrality and call drop, Face book, Whatsapp.
    14. Impact of Digital Technology on Labour.
    15. Information Technology Revolution and Social Revolution
    16. Current Status of Indigenous Research and Theory of Digital Technology
    17. Impact of Digital Technology on Indian Economy and Indian People
    18. Impact of Digital Technology on Politics State and Democracy
    19. Impact of Digitalization of Information on Library and Reading Habits
    20. Impact of Digitalization of the World on Human Freedom and Existence
    21. Impact of Digitalization of Language
    22. Impact of Geographic Information System on Future of Human
  3. Special Workshops/Colloquia
    1. Relevance and validity of selective approach to University Education System.
    2. Funding of Research and Development.
    3. Teacher-less class and Classless Teacher.
    4. Privatization/ Corporatization of Education.
    5. Dynamics of Rising Unemployment under Neoliberal Economy.
    6. Madan Mohan Malviya’s Vision of University Education System

0800 RESEARCH COMMITTEES

There are 28 subject Research Committees representing 32 disciplines of Science of Nature-Humans-Society in the 41st Indian Social Science Congress as given below. Each Research Committee will appraise and integrate ongoing researches and theories through symposia/seminars/workshops/special lectures. Teachers, students and scientists doing research on any problem in any discipline/subject are welcome to submit their Research papers which will be accepted after evaluation by the given Research Committees for presentation. Each RC will also organize a symposium involving critical appraisal of Education and Research on either the issues related with ‘Human Future In Digital Era’ or any other problem of great theoretical, methodological or practical importance.

  1. AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE Special Theme:
    1. I. Impact of Digitization on Agriculture
    2. Evolving Strategy for the Resolution of Deepening Agrarian Crisis
    3. Digital Technology and GM Crops
  2. ANTHROPOLOGY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Special theme:

    1. Impact of Digitalization of the World on Existence, Survival and Growth of Humans.
    2. Native and narratives in digital world.
    3. Ethnographies and narratives is a global world.
    4. Gift and Social exchange in global world.
    5. Digital Technology, Democracy and Human right.
    6. Digital Technology and Tribal Development.
    7. Digital Technology empowerment.
    8. Cultural awareness and Tribal empowerment
  3. ARCHAEOLOGY & HISTORY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Architectural Heritage and Digital Technology
    2. Archival Studies and digital technology
    3. Epigraphy and Digital Technology
    4. Prehistoric and Historical Research and Digital Technology.
    5. Impact of Digitization of the World on Culture
    6. Digitization and Numismatic Studies
  4. BIOLOGICAL OR LIFE SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE
    1. Theme: Biological Implications of World’s Digitization (Bioinformatics)
  5. BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Research in Biotechnology & Its Connections with Digitization
    2. India’s Dependence on Foreign/Imported Digital Technology
  6. CHEMICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE
    1. Impact of Digital Technology on Chemical Science
    2. Digital Chemical Technology and Human Future
  7. COMMERCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. (I) Impact Digitization on Trade and Commerce
    2. e-Commerce, e-Trading, GST and Corporate Capital
  8. COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitized Communication on People, Society and Social Cohesion
  9. COMPUTER SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Indigenous Development of Digital Technology
  10. .EARTH SCIENCE (GEOLOGY, OCEANIC SC, MARINE SC. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE ETC.) AND PLANETARY SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Digitization, Remote Sensing and The Planet Earth
    2. Technology and Weather Forecasting
  11. ECOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Digitization and Conservation of Ecology and Environment
  12. ECONOMICS RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Connection between Digital Technology and Economics
    2. Impact of Digital Technology on Employment and Generation of New Job Opportunity
    3. Impact of Digital Technology on Poverty, Hunger and under/mal nourishment
    4. Impact of Digital Technology on Employment and Skill Development
    5. Nexus between Digital Technology and Poverty & Well being
    6. Role of Digital Technology in Public Services Delivery
  13. EDUCATION RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization on School and University Education
    2. Impact of Digital Technology on Education, Learning and Research
    3. Teacher-less Class and Class-less Teacher
    4. Role of Digitized In Privatization/Corporatization/Commoditization of Education
    5. Funding of Research And Education
  14. ENGINEERING SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization on Engineering and Technological Education and Research
    2. of Digital Technology on Development and Innovations of Indigenous Technologies for Self-Reliant Development
  15. GEOGRAPHY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Geographical Perspectives on Population, Development and Ecology
  16. HOME SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization on Food and Home Kitchen
    2. of Digital of Digital Technology on Clothing and Life Style
  17. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDIES & DEFENCE STRATEGIC & STUDIES RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Digitized International Relations
    2. Digitized Weapons of Mass Destruction-led War and Destruction of Life from the Plant Earth
    3. India and Its Neighbors
    4. Trade War between USA and China
    5. of continued Conflict and War in Middle East
  18. JURIDICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEEHOME SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization on Social Justice
    2. Impact of Digitalization on Freedom, Privacy and Equality
    3. Cyber Crime
  19. LINGUISTICS RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization of Indian Languages and Creativity
  20. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. . Concept And Theory of Digitized Industrial and Social Management (e.g. Biometrics, Aadhar, DNA, etc)
    2. Digital Technology and e-Governance
  21. . MATHEMATICAL AND STATISTICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. . Mathematics of Digital Technology
    2. Informatics
    3. Digitalised Statistical Manipulations
    4. Big Data Analysis
  22. MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization Technology on Medical Science and Peoples Health
    2. Impact of Digital Technology Radiation on Peoples’ Health
    3. Necessity, Relevance and Effectiveness of Telemedicine.
    4. Digital Technology and Radiology
  23. . PHILOSOPHY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Philosophy of Digitized World
    2. Ethics of Digital Technology
  24. . PHYSICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Physics and Digital Technology
    2. Physics and Radiation
    3. Understanding Cosmic Radiation and its Connection with Digital Technology
    4. Physics and Economics
  25. POLITICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Political Power of Digital Technology
    2. Digital Technology and Democracy
    3. Digital Technology and State
    4. Digital Technology, Aadhar Card and National Register
    5. Digital Technology and Human Rights
    6. One country, one vote and Union of States
  26. PSYCHOLOGY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Psychology of Digital Technology Created Virtual World Vs Psychology of Real World
    2. Psychology of Virtual Learning
    3. Information Overload and Human Behaviour
    4. Digital Technology and Personality Disorder
  27. SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. . Effects of Digital Technology on Society and Social Behaviour
    2. Digital Technology, Social Violence and Social Work
  28. SOCIOLOGY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Sociology of Digital Technology
    2. Digital Technology, Family, Society and Social Alienation.
    3. Impact of Digital Technology on Social Processes and Social Technology
    4. Sociology of Digital Technology, Generated Violence (Rapes and Murders)
    5. Human in Digital Era: Opportunities and Threats
    6. Digital Era and Society: Changing nature of social relationship and social problems
    7. Women in Digital Era: Newer Horizons and Newer Challenges
    8. Youth and Children in Digital Era: Challenges and opportunities
    9. Digital Era: The Way Forward

0900 THEMATIC PANELS

There are 21 interdisciplinary Thematic Panels as stated below. Research scientists, policy planners, development administrators and social activists concerned with the given Panels are welcome to submit their research papers:


  1. Conflicts, War, Peace and Social Security
  2. Democracy And Human Rights
  3. Ecological and Environmental Protection Movements
  4. Ethics of Science and Society
  5. Global Warming and Climate Change
  6. History and Philosophy of Science
  7. Information Technology, Mass Media and Culture
  8. Labour in Organized and Unorganized Sectors
  9. Nation, States and Emerging Challenges
  10. Natural Resources, Bio-diversity and Geographic Information System
  11. Patent Laws and Intellectual Property Rights
  12. Peasants, Livelihood and Land-use
  13. People (Dalits, Tribes, Women, Peasants, etc) Struggles And Movements For Equitable Democratic Society
  14. Peoples Health and Quality of Life
  15. Political Economy of India
  16. Population, Poverty and Migration
  17. Rural Technology, Social Organizations and Rural Development
  18. Science Communication and Science Popularization
  19. Science, Technology and Social Development
  20. Social Processes, Social Structures and Social Alienation
  21. Unity of Science /Science of Nature-Humans-Society

Ad Hoc Group Discussion

Scientists or a group of scientists doing research on a new theme having newer theoretical and me-thodological and social implications are welcome to organize discussion on the same. Those interested in it are advised to send their proposal to the General Secretary before Oct 15, 2018. The proposer shall be its convener and should moblise 5-10 participants having papers on the same theme.

Eighth All India Young Scientists Convention

Eighth All India Young Scientists Convention will be held during the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress. Its main object is to bring young scientists of all subjects of science together to learn science of Nature-Humans-Society in order to do creative and original research and be able to play leadership role in the realm of Science and Society and Indian Social Science Academy.

Task Force

Task Force shall hold its deliberations on the deliberations of XLII Indian Social Science Congress in post-dinner session between 2130-2300 hours every day. It will present its ‘Trend Report’ to the assembly of delegates on December 19, 2018 at 1400 hrs for discussion and adoption. It is to explore and develop newer ideas, theories, methods and policy applications emerging from the deliberations of the XLII Indian Social Science Congress.

Submission of Papers

All university and college teachers, students and scientists working in CSIR, ICAR, ICMR, ICSSR, ICPR, ICHR, DST Institutes, IIISERS, NISERS, IITs, NITs, Engineering Colleges, Medical and Health Science Universities, Medical Colleges, AIIMS, PGIs, National/Regional Laboratories, DRDO’s In-stitutes/Laboratories, are cordially invited to present their research papers at the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress

Papers can be either based on research or on review of researches or study of policies and Peoples movements. Those who are working in the field and wish to present papers based on their field works too are welcome to present their papers. However, none is permitted to present papers by copying others’ papers from research Journals or internet. Each paper, therefore, has to be accompanied by a duly signed ‘Declaration Form’ given in the annexure. Scientists found guilty of plagiarization shall be respon-sible for their acts.

Three copies of a paper, with CD and its abstract in triplicate should be submitted to the General Secretary, Indian Social Science Academy. Abstract of papers should be within 500 words and the paper within 7000 words and format given in the annexureshould be used

It is advisable to e-mail abstracts and papers to the respective Chairman of Research Com-mittees/Thematic Panels and the General Secretary, ISSA in order to facilitate quick response (See pp 19-31). All papers are edited by the respective research committees. Provisional acceptance is issued on receipt of abstract of the paper and final acceptance after submission of the full paper and completion of registration.

Dates For Submission of Papers

The last date for submission of abstract and full paper are as follows:

(i) Last Date For Submission of Abstract : December 01, 2018
(ii) Last Date For Submission of Full Paper: December 10, 2018

It may be noted that one can submit paper even after the last date and till December 10, 2018. No paper, however, will be received during the session of the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress. The papers received after December 10 , 2018 will be printed after the XLII ISSC is over.

Since issue of visa is a time consuming process, the foreign scholars are advised to submit the abstract of their papers before September 15, 2018 and the full paper before November 30, 2018 along with their bio-data after visiting website of Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India

Medium

Papers can be submitted either in Hindi or in English as the Hindi and English are the official languages of Indian Social Science Congress. As a policy Indian Social Science Academy would like to have all Indian languages as the medium of exchange at ISSC. However, it doesn’t have resources for it. Those who cannot write in Hindi or English are welcome to write in their language. However, they are ex-pected to mail the original text of their papers along with the translated copy either in Hindi or Eng-lish.

Gold Medals

Two Gold Medals, namely, A.K. Tharien Gold Medal and B.V. Rangarao Gold Medal are available for the best papers presented at the XLII Indian Social Science Congress. Two best papers of XLII ISSC adjudged by appropriate committee shall be given Gold Medals at the next session of Indian Social Science Congress in 2019.

Accommodation and Food

All registered delegates of XLII Indian Social Science Congress shall be provided free Guest House/Hostel Accommodation and free food with effect from December 26, 2018 (dinner) to January1, 2019 (breakfast). Accommodation, however, will be available from December 26, 2018 morning. Foreign delegates will be provided accommodation on receipt of intimation well in advance. Those wishing to stay in hotels are advised to make their own arrangements. The Organizing Committee would charge rent for the accommodation prior to December 26 and after December 31, 2018.

All correspondence regarding accommodation should be addressed to the Local Organizing Secre-tary. Filled-in Accommodation And Food Form and Travel Form given in the annexure should be mailed to the Local Organizing Secretary before November 20, 2018..

Transport and Registration

All registered delegates of XLII Indian Social Science Congress will be received at railway station/ airport/bus station at Bhubaneswar.

Kashi Darshan

Bhubaneswar is a beautiful place. Arrangement for visit to beautiful places will be made on De-cember 26, 2018 and January 1, 2019. Delegates desirous of seeing the beautiful and historical places are requested to contact the Organizing Secretary well in advance.

Registration

All those who wish to present their research papers at XLII Indian Social Science Congress are re-quired to get themselves registered by paying the stipulated registration fee. Details of registration fee a as follows:

Category Up to December 20, 2018 From December21, 2018
Member Delegate Rs 3,000.00 Rs 3,500.00
Non-Member Delegate Rs 4,000.00 Rs 4,500.00
Institutional Member Delegate(up to three persons) Rs 10,000.00 Rs 12,500.00
Non Member Institutional Delegate(up to three persons) Rs 15,000.00 Rs 18,500.00
Member Students Delegate Rs 2,000.00 Rs 25,500.00
Non-Member Students Delegate Rs 2,500.00 Rs 3,000.00
Local Delegate Rs 2,000.00 Rs 2,500.00
Foreign Delegates
     From Afro-Asian-Latin American Countries Rs. 5,000.00 Rs. 6,000.00
     From Other Countries(North America and europe) US $ 200.00 US $ 250.00
Accompanying Persons*
     Indian Rs. 2,000.00 Rs. 2,500.00
     Afro-Asian-Latin American Countries Rs. 2,500.00 Rs. 3,000.00
     Other Foreign Countries(North America and europe) US $ 150.00 US $ 200.00

*The word ‘accompanying person’ means wife or husband or child. A child below the age of 6 years shall not be charged for food

One who is not a member but wishes to become member of the Indian Social Science Academy can send the membership fee and the registration fee meant for member-delegate along with filled-in membership and registration forms.

An institution/organization can depute its three or more representatives to the Indian Social Science Congress. In the event of more than three representatives, the cost of registration for individual delegate (member or non-member) shall be payable by the concerned institution/organization.

Unregistered scholars attending XLII Indian Social Science Congress shall be required to buy the food coupon from the counter. No certificate shall be issued to unregistered scholars or scholars who have registered without submitting any papers. No one will be entitled to receive literature of XLII ISSC without registration.

The Registered delegate is entitled to receive kitbags, all publications of the XLII Indian Social Science Congress including its proceedings free of cost, free hostel accommodation, free meals, and free transport from the Guest House/Hostel to the venue of XLII ISSC. The Organizing Committee may provide free or on payment transport from the railway station/airport to the Guest House/Hostel depending upon its resources. However, delegates staying in hotels or on their own shall not be entitled for free transport. Local registered delegates will be entitled for kitbags, free lunch, day tea/coffee and banquets only. Free Breakfast, lunch, day tea and dinner will be available to registered delegates with effect from evening of December 26, 2018 to the morning breakfast of January 1, 2019 only.

The registration fee should be sent to the General Secretary, Indian Social Science Academy by an account payee DD in favour of Indian Social Science Academy payable at Allahabad under registered cover. Outstation cheque or money order will not be entertained. Multicity cheques will be accepted.

Although on the spot registration will be made, yet the Organizing Committee is not bound to pro-vide hostel accommodation to such outstation delegates if the accommodation is not available.

It is, therefore, advisable to get registered within the stipulated time in order to avoid last minutes inconvenience.

The invited scholars and members of the Executive Council, NAAC, Organizing Committee, Re-search Committees, Thematic Panels, Task Force and other bodies and special invitees are advised to pay the registration fee within the stipulated period and act in accordance with advice by the General Secretary, Indian Social Sciences Academy. None is exempted from registration fee. Registration is necessary for enabling the Organizing Committee to arrange accommodation, transport and food for all.

Timely registration and intimation of need for accommodation will facilitate planning for food, accommodation, Transport, Kits, etc.

Refund of the registration fee will be made after deducting 40% as the service charges if the re-quest for it is received before December 10, 2018. Literature of the XLII ISSC, however, shall not be sup-plied in such cases. Those who have registered but are not able to attend the XLII ISSC because of un-avoidable reasons would be supplied all the publications if their request for refund is not received within the stipulated date or if they do not wish refund.

In the event of more than one author of a paper, all will be required to pay the registration fee in-dividually. Co-author of a paper shall not be treated as accompanying person.

Membership

Indian Social Science Congress is open to ISSA members as well non-members. Those who wish to become members of ISSA are advised to post their membership fee along with filled-in membership form to the General Secretary. Such new members shall be eligible for concession in registration fee of XLII ISSC.

Travel Support

All the scholars working in universities, colleges, research institutes, laboratories and R&D organizations shall be expected to seek travel and registration support from their respective organizations. Those who are retired or do not enjoy any institutional support are advised to write to the General Secretary, Indian Social Science Academy before October 15, 2018. All research students in receipt of UGC/CSIR/ICSSR/ICHR/ICPR Fellowships shall meet their travel and registration fee from their contin-gency grants. Such research students who are not receiving any fellowship are advised to write to the Gen-eral Secretary along with ‘bonafide’ and ‘non-receipt of Fellowship’ from their Registrar. Partial or full support will be provided on availability of fund. All Plenary speakers, Chairpersons/Conveners not having institutional support are advised to inform the General Secretary at the earliest.

All requests for travel support will be considered by the appropriate committee and decision will be com-municated by December 15, 2018.

one without paper and without prior commitment by the General Secretary in writing shall be entitled for travel support and on the spot payment of the TA bill is subject to receipt of UGC Grant before December 26, 2018 by Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha.

Programmes

Programs of XLII Indian Social Science Congress shall begin at 0900 a.m. and will continue till 23.00 hours every day. Registration of local delegates will commence on December 25, 2018 and outstation registered delegates on Dec 26, 2018 An outline of programs of XLII ISSC is given inside the cover page. The structure of programs will be as follows:

0800 - Registration
0900-1300 Plenary
1300-1400 Lunch Break
1400-1700 Parallel Sessions
1700-1830 Special/Public Lectures
1830-1900 Free Time
1930-2030 Cultural Programs/Official Meeting
12130-2300 Task Force/Young Scientists Meet/State Social Science Academies

(Those RCs, Thematic Panels/Symposia, Seminars etc needing extra time can hold their sessions during 1900-2030 and 2139-2300 hours)

Inauguration of XLII ISSC will be held between 1000-1200 hrs on December 27, 2018 and the valedictory between 1600-1800 hrs on December 31, 2018.

Printed copies of Programmes will be available to registered delegates with Kits from the registration counter with effect from December 26, 2018. Discount of 40-50% will be available on ISSA publications.

All Research Committees, Thematic Panels and Symposia groups shall meet on December 26, 2018 at 14.30 hrs. at Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha.

Annual Meeting of the General House of the Indian Academy of Social Sciences will be held on December 28, 2018 at 1800 hrs at Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha

Organizing Committee and Executive Council shall meet on December 26, 2018 at 10.00 a.m. at Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha

No Committee/Panel other than Plenary can hold meetings between 0900-1300 hrs.

Certificate

Certificates will be available to the registered delegates with papers from the registration counter with effect from December 31, 2018 noon. All the registered delegates wishing to obtain certificates are re-quested to submit ‘Self-Appraisal Participation Report’ to the registration counter latest by December 30, 2018 at 10.00 a.m.

No certificate will be issued to the registered delegates without papers. Participation without paper by the local scholars is welcome, but no participation certificate will be issued to them.

Although all are expected to stay and participate in the deliberations of XLII Indian Social Science Congress with effect from December 27 to 31, 2018, yet those who wish to leave before because of some urgency are advised to inform the Local Organizing Secretary and the registration counter the date and time of their departure along with their postal addresses in writing. Their certificates will be posted later on.

Whom to contact?

PLEASE MAIL YOUR PAPER, MEMBERSHIP AND REGISTRATION TO THE FOLLOWING:

  • Dr. N.P. Chaubey
  • General Secretary
  • Indian Social Science Academy
  • Iswar Saran Ashram Campus,
  • Allahabad 211004 (U.P.)
  • Email: issaald@gmail.com; Tel: 0532-2544245 (O), 0532-2544570 (R)
  • Website: www.issaindia.in
  • Or
  • Dr. D.M. Diwakar
  • Member-Secretary
  • XLII Indian Social Science Congress
  • Professor & Head of Economics,
  • Former Director,
  • A.N. Sinha Institute of Social Studies,
  • Patna 800001 (Bihar)
  • Email: dmdiwakar@yahoo.co.in
  • Tel: 0612-2219395, M: 09472973336
  • Organizing Secretary
  • Dr Sasmitarani Samanta
  • Organizing Secretary
  • 42nd Indian Social Science Congress
  • Registrar, Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar
  • Email: bbkarfch@kiit.ac.in
  • M: +919437035188; +919937220218
  • Website: www.kiit.ac.in

PLEASE MAIL YOUR FILLED-IN FOOD & ACCOMMODATION FORM AND TRAVEL FORM TO THE FOLLOWING:

  • Joint-Organizing Secretary
  • (i) Dr Bishwavandita Kar
  • Director, KIIT Research Cell
  • Professor in School of Applied Sciences,
  • Dean, School of Yoga
  • Email id: bbkrfch@kiit.ac.in 9937043375
  • Joint-Organizing Secretary
  • Dr Banshidhar Mulia
  • Head, Department of Plastic Surgery
  • KIMS, KIIT University
  • Email id: mailtodrbans@gmail.com
  • Mobile No. +917077927835

PLEASE VISIT WEBSITES: ISSA: www.issaindia.in and Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, Web-site: www.kiit.ac.in

PLEASE CONTACT RESPECTIVE RESEARCH COMMITTEE/THEMTIC PANEL/ SEMINARS/ SYMPOSIA/WORKSHOP/COLLOQUIA CHAIRPERSONS (See Pp 19-31)

0100 PREAMBLE

Indian Social Science Academy (ISSA) and Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University (KIITU) propose to focus deliberations of the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress on ‘Human Future in Digital Era’ with a view to exploring the impact of information and communication technology-based massive digitisation of the world on future condition of humans.

0201 CONTEXT

We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that is fundamentally altering the way we work, communicate (television, face-books, WhatsApp, websites, internet, mobile... ) and, indeed, the way we live. We do not yet know just how it will unfold, but what we do know is that in its scale, scope, and complexity, the emerging technological transformation is going to be very different from transformations experienced by society during the First, Second and Third industrial revolutions.

The First industrial revolution used steam power to mechanise production, the Second, electric power to create mass production, the Third, electronics and communication technologies based digitisa-tion of machine functions leading to automated production. Impact of these transformations on health, life styles, employment, environment, culturally configured human skills, to migration and globalisation have been discussed and debated.

The speed of current breakthroughs has no historical precedent. Today’s transformations are not linear extrapolation or prolongation of the Third Industrial Revolution but rather beginning of a distinct Fourth Industrial revolution . The Fourth industrial revolution is building on digitisation of not only func-tions of mechanical systems but of human behaviour too. The enhanced technological capabilities of processing digitised data of large number of mechanical systems and humans with speed enables config-uring a variety of systems/products that combine humans with machines to cater to both perceived and created requirements of targeted segments of society. The digitisation is, thus, leading to a Digital Age characterized by a fusion of technologies that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres.

This Digital Age is heralding changes that cover in scope and depth the systems of production, management, governance, interaction between people and, indeed, almost all facets of our living on the planet earth.

The question is to what extent and how is this Digital transformation addressing problems of basic needs of hunger, education, health and employment for all ?

Are critical problems of developmental of rising income inequalities where few persons have as much as half of the total wealth of all the inhabitants of the planet or the problems of climate change and sustainability threatening the very existence of humans on earth on the agenda of agents and agencies steering digitisation ? Does the agenda envisage a more democratic and cultured world?

These are some of the issues arising out of the emerging technological revolution that the 42nd In-dian Social Science Congress on ‘Human Future in Digital Era’ aims to dialogue and discuss comprehen-sively integrating technological, social, political, economic and policy perspectives amongst stakeholders of the global community , from the public and private sectors to academia and civil society.

0202 INDIAN CONTEXT

In recent years Digitisation has also emerged an important and integral part of the development agenda of Sovereign Socialist Secular Democratic Republic of India; ‘Digital India’ is an enthusiastic rhetoric of the present Government.

Historically, Digitisation in India entered in the ninety fifties, like in the western countries , through scientific research requirements in areas like nuclear physics and cosmic rays. Observations by electronic devices in these areas gave digital data that required processing and analysis or computation. In India Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) was engaged in cosmic ray and nuclear physics. Homi Bhabha supported by Nehruvian thrust on science, nucleated a team to work on digital and computer technology. By 1959, the team succeeded in bringing out a functional computer christened by Nehru in 1962 as TIFR Automatic Calculator (TIFRAC); a first generation machine using vacuum tubes, germanium diodes and resistors. Over 50 organisations including research laboratories, universities, and government agencies regularly used the machine for research purposes.

By 1960s, however, in industrialised countries more advanced computers with faster online proc-essing speeds using new computer languages had been developed. Although TIFR and its public sector partner Electronics Corporation of India Limited (ECIL) did further work on a model more advanced than TIFRAC, in the absence of supporting electronic component fabrication facilities in India, they could not keep pace with the advancement taking place abroad. However, perusing policy of developing indigenous research capabilities, in 1963 IIT Kanpur for research work got an IBM 360 machine under the Indo- American aid programme through personal efforts of Nehru. Also, P.C. Mahalanabis, for performing sta-tistical calculations for planning commission, got an imported Hollieth Computer at Indian Statistical Institute (ISI). Indeed, ISI in collaboration with Jadavpur University did come up with a transistor based computer which was specifically used for research purposes.

Computer and digitisation expertise had got seeded in India

Towards the end of 1960s computers had entered a marketable product at the hands of companies in US, and Europe. In early 1970s IBM of US, enthused by its experience of introducing computers in few Indian academic institutions, decided to get a market foothold in India. It proposed introduction of computers in large and expanding non- strategic areas such as railways reservation to GOI. The then Indira Gandhi’s government committed to a policy of establishing a strong indigenous base in emerging areas of S & T apprehending expansion of IBM may thwart the progress of indigenous programme of computer development, set up an ‘Electronics Committee’ headed by Vikram Sarabhai to examine IBMs proposal in detail. The examination revealed that IBMs proposal essentially was to install its old machines in India and earn by refurbishing and leasing them out at inflated rates to government departments; the cover story of IBM, however, was that it wanted to help India gradually build computer capabilities.

The growing importance of electronics was recognised and a separate Department of Electronics (DOE) and Electronics Commission were established to give thrust to indigenous development of all areas of electronics including computers. DOE initiated a parliamentary enquiry committee to examine the working of IBM in India. The Committee rejecting IBM’s proposal asked DOE to establish a public sector undertaking ‘Computer Maintenance Corporation’ (CMC), through which IBM’s team had to maintain its installed computers In India. Caught in its own game, IBM got a clear signal that a strong market foot-hold in India was difficult. Finally, in 1977 during the Janata Government, George Fernandes invoked For-eign Exchange Regulation Act (FERA), the conditions of which were such that IBM decided to wind up its operations in India.

By end of 1970s facilitated by ‘digitisation’, convergence of hitherto separate computer and tele-communication technologies had been realised. Multinational Companies in US, Japan and Europe started making and selling digital electronic switches for telephone exchanges as faster substitute of hitherto used slow and cumbersome electro-mechanical switches. They had established a monopoly position in it.

India also wanted to shift from electro-mechanical to digital switching system to meet the fast growing demand for telephones. A lot of marketing pressure was put by multinational on India’s Depart-ment of Telecommunications (DOT) to buy their property new digital switching system. Under the cir-cumstances GOI asked Department of Electronics and DOT to jointly establish a Centre for Develop-ment of Telecommunication( C-DOT) with development of electronic switching as one of its mandate. It is around this time (1984) that NRI Sam Pitroda with established credentials in the communication technol-ogy living in US while on a visit to India for attending a Conference, impressed by digital and computer expertise available in India, presented a plan of making digital switching system in India to Indira Gandhi and her cabinet colleagues. Pitroda’s suggested digital switch , unlike those of multinationals meant to work in clean air-conditioned environment, promised to work in dusty and hot rural environment. Im-pressed by the presentation and sensing the possibility of making telephone accessible to both rural and urban populations through indigenous technology, Prime Minister invited Sam Pitroda and extended him a grant to head to an independent project at C-DOT for indigenously making digital switches. As a result, digital switching system that could work in dusty and hot rural and urban environment were not only de-veloped but under one of the technology missions of Rajiv Gandhi (the young PM after the death of Indira Gandhi) , C-DOT delivered 60 million lines through Public Call Offices (PCOs) leading to an exponential growth of the telecom services. For the first time since independence telephone communication was brought within walking distance of a large cross section of India’s population. To give further push to dig-itisation and computerisation, Rajiv Gandhi in 1984 established Telecom Commission, the country’s high-est telecom policymaking body and made Pitroda’s Chief technology advisor to PM its first chairperson. Centre for Development of Advanced Computers (C-DAC) was also established. A Computer Policy was formulated that allowed import of computers for developing and exporting software. It is during this time that in response to a ban imposed by US government on its CRAY company to supply its supercom-puter to India ( required for weather forecasting purposes) , C-DAC came out with its own supercomputer Param.

By now a good indigenous base in digitisation technology had been created in India

Here it may be noted that Mrs. Indira Gandhi, the Prime Minister of India, had refused USA’s pressure for computerisation of Indian Railways in 1984.

In 1991, however, Indian economy under Narasimha Rao and Manmohan Singh had started opening The government further eased controls on import of computers and allowed the import of fully assembled motherboards with processors, the core of a computer with connected chips. Locally made peripheral components could then be added to it to assemble a computer system. Although duty had to be paid for import of motherboard, overall there was a net reduction in the price of computers.

With wider availability of computers, in 1995, the then public sector monopoly Videsh Sanchar Nigam Limited launched India’s first internet service for public access. The country saw a mushrooming of internet cafes.

In 1998, global multimillion computer industry was caught in an unexpected lack of foresight of the coming year 2000. It had failed to anticipate that the practice of keeping only two empty places in the memory to specify a year ( to save memory space) could lead to systems breaking down when January 1, 2000 dawned, known as ‘Y2K’ problem . The task of trawling through millions of lines of installed computer code to correct the Y2K fault was not only tedious but time consuming. 'Y2K was like godsend for India’s software capabilities using which Indian firms had quickly developed methods of debugging computers programmed to use only two digits to signify the year. India’s earnings through export of software companies rose exponentially and ever since have continued to grow.

With expansion of telecommunication and internet usage entry of mobile phones followed and by now have widely penetrated in India.

Building on the evolved digital infrastructure, government , national and multinational companies, non-government organisations have started using it some for welfare and some for commercial purposes.

In a sense India is at a stage where it has some expertise in digital technology as also appears to be taking a step forward to enter the Digital age.

0300 OBJECTIVES

The proposed deliberations, on ‘Human Future in Digital Era’ seek to achieve following objectives:
0301. To comprehand the science of digital technology/Information Technology.
0302. To determine status of development of digital technology in India.
0303. To explore the connections between digital technology and production & distribution.
0304. To investigate connection between digital technology and employment.
0305. To find out association between digital technology and education.
0306. To assess impact of digital technology on learning and creativity,
0307. To evaluate impact of digital technology on health of the general public.
0308. To determine the impact digital technology on social cohesion, peace, conflict, violence, rapes and murders.
0309. To ascertain secularising and/or communalising effects of digital technology.
0310. To investigate relationship between digital technology and bio-diversity including ecology and envi-ronment.
0311. To assess power of digital technology in stopping extinction of species and saving the world from extinction.
0312. To determine the power of digital technology in making the future of human better, safer and secure.
0313. To determine the power of digital technology for promoting slavery and destroying democracy.
0314. To investigate effects of Digital Technology/Information Teachnology/robotics on human personalities and human behaviour.
0315 To explore effects of ‘Information overload’ on human thoughts, creativity and behaviour.
0316Any other relevant to the understanding of the need, relevance and validity of Digital/Information Technology/Robotics..

401 ISSUES FOR DIALOGUE AND DISCUSSION

Taking note of the above context the following are some of the issues that require concerted consideration and discussion:

  1. The extent to which indigenous technological base of India has improved? Is India today self-reliant in Digital Technology?
  2. Has India’s dependence on foreign S & T declined substantially?
  3. Is dependence of Indian industries on imported technology increased or decreased ?
  4. What aspects of India’s socio-economic development are on the computerisation and digitisation agenda and details thereof:
    • Employment for all able persons?
    • Redress problems of hunger and disease?
    • Agriculture Productivity and farmers welfare?
  5. Will digitisation upgrade or degrade skills of Indian youth and artisans?
    In order to seek valid answers to all these and many more questions scientists need to keep the following four major questions in view:
    • What was India before introduction of computer or digital technology?
    • What is India today?
    • What will India be tomorrow?
    • What India ought to be?

0402 NEW PHRASES/BUZZWORDS

While dialoguing on above questions we need to pay due attention to some of the following new phrases/buzzwords commonly found in the rhetoric being communicated to us by digital media 24 x 7 .

SiliconValley, Knowledge Society, Global Village, Virtual World, Information Revolution, Ama-zon, Flipkart, Google, Aadhar card, A.T.M., Paytm, E-governance, E-commerce, Smart Phone, Smart Town, Cyber Crime, Tele-medicine, Cashless Economy, Skill development, Make-in-India, Sting Operation, Net Neutrality, Selfie, Video, Internet Chat, Social Media, Whatsapp Cloud Technology, Big data, etc. ,

0500 WIDER PRESPECTIVE

What is true for India may be true for all other Asian, African and Latin American countries. It would enrich the proposed deliberations if scientists from these countries including USA, Canada, Europe and Australia contribute their research papers and participate in the deliberations.

Indian Social Science Academy and Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, there-fore, propose to focus the deliberations of the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress on ‘Human Future in Digital Era’. It invites all scientists, technologists, philosophers, social activists, policy planners and the General public to put forward resuslts of their research/thinking at the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress. All the science academies of today’s world arecordially invited.

0600 MAJOR THEMES

Following may be considered as major sub-themes of the focul theme ‘Human Future In Digital Era’:
0501. Science and Technology of Digital Era.
0502. Politics and political implication of Digital Era.
0503. Connection between digital technology and economy.
0504. Impact of digital technology on employment and generation of new job opportunities.
0505. Impact of digital technology on Peoples Health.
0506. Impact of digital technology on education, learning and research.
0507. Impact of digital technology on removal of poverty and large scale undernourish-ment/malnourishment.
0508. Digital Technology, social cohesion, social alienation and social violence.
0509. Biodiversity, ecology global warming and digital technology.
0510. Social Justice, crimes and digital technology.
0511. Digital technology, Democracy and the new forms of slavery.
0512. Role of digital technology in conflicts and war.
0513. Information over load And Human Behaviour.
0514 Virtual Learning And Real Learning
0515 e-governance and law-And-order.

0700 Seminars/Symposia/Colloquia/ Workshops Themes

  1. International
    1. Science of Real World Vs Science of Virtual World.
    2. Impact of digitization/information technology on World Economy and Peoples Economic conditions.
    3. Centralizing power of digital technology and sustainability of the Human on Planet Earth.
    4. Nuclearisation, Digitization and Annihilation of Human.
    5. Third World War
    6. Madan Mohan Malviya’s Vision of University Education System
  2. National
    1. Status of indigenous Science and Technology.
    2. Status of Indigenous Digital Science and Technology.
    3. Impact of digital/information technology on Indian Economy.
    4. Impact of digital/information Technology on Indian Agriculture.
    5. Impact of digital Technology on Peoples quality of life and health.
    6. Impact of digital/information technology on School and University Education System.
    7. Digital Technology and Social Alienation.
    8. Digital Technology/Information Technology and Social Violence (rapes, murders).
    9. Digital Technology/Information Technology Democracy and Human Rights.
    10. Impact of Digital/Information Technology on Family, Community, Society and Culture.
    11. E-commerce, e-trading, GST, and Corporate Capital.
    12. Secularizing/Communalizing Effects of Digital/Information Technology.
    13. Cyber Crimes, Net-Neutrality and call drop, Face book, Whatsapp.
    14. Impact of Digital Technology on Labour.
    15. Information Technology Revolution and Social Revolution
  3. Special Workshops/Colloquia
    1. Relevance and validity of selective approach to University Education System.
    2. Funding of Research and Development.
    3. Teacher-less class and Classless Teacher.
    4. Privatization/ Corporatization of Education.
    5. Dynamics of Rising Unemployment under Neoliberal Economy.
    6. Madan Mohan Malviya’s Vision of University Education System

APPROACH

The proposed deliberations on ‘Human Future In Digital Era’ call for intra, inter and multi disciplinary objective, dispassionate and non-political approach. Twenty Eight Subjects Research Committees, 21 interdisciplinary Thematic Panels, 8 plenaries, several international and national semi-nars/symposia/workshops/colloquia, special and public lectures by eminent scientists shall, therefore, deli-berate upon all aspects of the focal theme ‘Human Future In Digital Era’,synthesis of the results of deli-berations will be done by Task Force of the XLII Indian Social Science Congress.

  1. AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE Special Theme:
    1. I. Impact of Digitization on Agriculture
    2. Evolving Strategy for the Resolution of Deepening Agrarian Crisis
    3. Digital Technology and GM Crops
  2. ANTHROPOLOGY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Special theme:

    1. Impact of Digitalization of the World on Existence, Survival and Growth of Humans.
    2. Native and narratives in digital world.
    3. Ethnographies and narratives is a global world.
    4. Gift and Social exchange in global world.
    5. Digital Technology, Democracy and Human right.
    6. Digital Technology and Tribal Development.
    7. Digital Technology empowerment.
    8. Cultural awareness and Tribal empowerment
  3. ARCHAEOLOGY & HISTORY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Architectural Heritage and Digital Technology
    2. Archival Studies and digital technology
    3. Epigraphy and Digital Technology
    4. Prehistoric and Historical Research and Digital Technology.
    5. Impact of Digitization of the World on Culture
    6. Digitization and Numismatic Studies
  4. BIOLOGICAL OR LIFE SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE
    1. Theme: Biological Implications of World’s Digitization (Bioinformatics)
  5. BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Research in Biotechnology & Its Connections with Digitization
    2. India’s Dependence on Foreign/Imported Digital Technology
  6. CHEMICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE
    1. Impact of Digital Technology on Chemical Science
    2. Digital Chemical Technology and Human Future
  7. COMMERCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. (I) Impact Digitization on Trade and Commerce
    2. e-Commerce, e-Trading, GST and Corporate Capital
  8. COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitized Communication on People, Society and Social Cohesion
  9. COMPUTER SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Indigenous Development of Digital Technology
  10. .EARTH SCIENCE (GEOLOGY, OCEANIC SC, MARINE SC. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE ETC.) AND PLANETARY SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Digitization, Remote Sensing and The Planet Earth
    2. Technology and Weather Forecasting
  11. ECOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Digitization and Conservation of Ecology and Environment
  12. ECONOMICS RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Connection between Digital Technology and Economics
    2. Impact of Digital Technology on Employment and Generation of New Job Opportunity
    3. Impact of Digital Technology on Poverty, Hunger and under/mal nourishment
    4. Impact of Digital Technology on Employment and Skill Development
    5. Nexus between Digital Technology and Poverty & Well being
    6. Role of Digital Technology in Public Services Delivery
  13. EDUCATION RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization on School and University Education
    2. Impact of Digital Technology on Education, Learning and Research
    3. Teacher-less Class and Class-less Teacher
    4. Role of Digitized In Privatization/Corporatization/Commoditization of Education
    5. Funding of Research And Education
  14. ENGINEERING SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization on Engineering and Technological Education and Research
    2. of Digital Technology on Development and Innovations of Indigenous Technologies for Self-Reliant Development
  15. GEOGRAPHY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Geographical Perspectives on Population, Development and Ecology
  16. HOME SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization on Food and Home Kitchen
    2. of Digital of Digital Technology on Clothing and Life Style
  17. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDIES & DEFENCE STRATEGIC & STUDIES RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Digitized International Relations
    2. Digitized Weapons of Mass Destruction-led War and Destruction of Life from the Plant Earth
    3. India and Its Neighbors
    4. Trade War between USA and China
    5. of continued Conflict and War in Middle East
  18. JURIDICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEEHOME SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization on Social Justice
    2. Impact of Digitalization on Freedom, Privacy and Equality
    3. Cyber Crime
  19. LINGUISTICS RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization of Indian Languages and Creativity
  20. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. . Concept And Theory of Digitized Industrial and Social Management (e.g. Biometrics, Aadhar, DNA, etc)
    2. Digital Technology and e-Governance
  21. . MATHEMATICAL AND STATISTICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. . Mathematics of Digital Technology
    2. Informatics
    3. Digitalised Statistical Manipulations
    4. Big Data Analysis
  22. MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Impact of Digitization Technology on Medical Science and Peoples Health
    2. Impact of Digital Technology Radiation on Peoples’ Health
    3. Necessity, Relevance and Effectiveness of Telemedicine.
    4. Digital Technology and Radiology
  23. . PHILOSOPHY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Philosophy of Digitized World
    2. Ethics of Digital Technology
  24. . PHYSICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Physics and Digital Technology
    2. Physics and Radiation
    3. Understanding Cosmic Radiation and its Connection with Digital Technology
    4. Physics and Economics
  25. POLITICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Political Power of Digital Technology
    2. Digital Technology and Democracy
    3. Digital Technology and State
    4. Digital Technology, Aadhar Card and National Register
    5. Digital Technology and Human Rights
    6. One country, one vote and Union of States
  26. PSYCHOLOGY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Psychology of Digital Technology Created Virtual World Vs Psychology of Real World
    2. Psychology of Virtual Learning
    3. Information Overload and Human Behaviour
    4. Digital Technology and Personality Disorder
  27. SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. . Effects of Digital Technology on Society and Social Behaviour
    2. Digital Technology, Social Violence and Social Work
  28. SOCIOLOGY RESEARCH COMMITTEE

      Theme:

    1. Sociology of Digital Technology
    2. Digital Technology, Family, Society and Social Alienation.
    3. Impact of Digital Technology on Social Processes and Social Technology
    4. Sociology of Digital Technology, Generated Violence (Rapes and Murders)
    5. Human in Digital Era: Opportunities and Threats
    6. Digital Era and Society: Changing nature of social relationship and social problems
    7. Women in Digital Era: Newer Horizons and Newer Challenges
    8. Youth and Children in Digital Era: Challenges and opportunities
    9. Digital Era: The Way Forward

0900 THEMATIC PANELS

There are 21 interdisciplinary Thematic Panels as stated below. Research scientists, policy planners, development administrators and social activists concerned with the given Panels are welcome to submit their research papers:


  1. Conflicts, War, Peace and Social Security
  2. Democracy And Human Rights
  3. Ecological and Environmental Protection Movements
  4. Ethics of Science and Society
  5. Global Warming and Climate Change
  6. History and Philosophy of Science
  7. Information Technology, Mass Media and Culture
  8. Labour in Organized and Unorganized Sectors
  9. Nation, States and Emerging Challenges
  10. Natural Resources, Bio-diversity and Geographic Information System
  11. Patent Laws and Intellectual Property Rights
  12. Peasants, Livelihood and Land-use
  13. People (Dalits, Tribes, Women, Peasants, etc) Struggles And Movements For Equitable Democratic Society
  14. Peoples Health and Quality of Life
  15. Political Economy of India
  16. Population, Poverty and Migration
  17. Rural Technology, Social Organizations and Rural Development
  18. Science Communication and Science Popularization
  19. Science, Technology and Social Development
  20. Social Processes, Social Structures and Social Alienation
  21. Unity of Science /Science of Nature-Humans-Society

Ad Hoc Group Discussion

Scientists or a group of scientists doing research on a new theme having newer theoretical and me-thodological and social implications are welcome to organize discussion on the same. Those interested in it are advised to send their proposal to the General Secretary before Oct 15, 2018. The proposer shall be its convener and should moblise 5-10 participants having papers on the same theme.

Eighth All India Young Scientists Convention

Eighth All India Young Scientists Convention will be held during the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress. Its main object is to bring young scientists of all subjects of science together to learn science of Nature-Humans-Society in order to do creative and original research and be able to play leadership role in the realm of Science and Society and Indian Social Science Academy.

Task Force

Task Force shall hold its deliberations on the deliberations of XLII Indian Social Science Congress in post-dinner session between 2130-2300 hours every day. It will present its ‘Trend Report’ to the assembly of delegates on December 19, 2018 at 1400 hrs for discussion and adoption. It is to explore and develop newer ideas, theories, methods and policy applications emerging from the deliberations of the XLII Indian Social Science Congress.

Submission of Papers

All university and college teachers, students and scientists working in CSIR, ICAR, ICMR, ICSSR, ICPR, ICHR, DST Institutes, IIISERS, NISERS, IITs, NITs, Engineering Colleges, Medical and Health Science Universities, Medical Colleges, AIIMS, PGIs, National/Regional Laboratories, DRDO’s In-stitutes/Laboratories, are cordially invited to present their research papers at the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress

Papers can be either based on research or on review of researches or study of policies and Peoples movements. Those who are working in the field and wish to present papers based on their field works too are welcome to present their papers. However, none is permitted to present papers by copying others’ papers from research Journals or internet. Each paper, therefore, has to be accompanied by a duly signed ‘Declaration Form’ given in the annexure. Scientists found guilty of plagiarization shall be respon-sible for their acts.

Three copies of a paper, with CD and its abstract in triplicate should be submitted to the General Secretary, Indian Social Science Academy. Abstract of papers should be within 500 words and the paper within 7000 words and format given in the annexureshould be used

It is advisable to e-mail abstracts and papers to the respective Chairman of Research Com-mittees/Thematic Panels and the General Secretary, ISSA in order to facilitate quick response (See pp 19-31). All papers are edited by the respective research committees. Provisional acceptance is issued on receipt of abstract of the paper and final acceptance after submission of the full paper and completion of registration.

Dates For Submission of Papers

The last date for submission of abstract and full paper are as follows:

(i) Last Date For Submission of Abstract : December 01, 2018
(ii) Last Date For Submission of Full Paper: December 10, 2018

It may be noted that one can submit paper even after the last date and till December 10, 2018. No paper, however, will be received during the session of the 42nd Indian Social Science Congress. The papers received after December 10 , 2018 will be printed after the XLII ISSC is over.

Since issue of visa is a time consuming process, the foreign scholars are advised to submit the abstract of their papers before September 15, 2018 and the full paper before November 30, 2018 along with their bio-data after visiting website of Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India

Medium

Papers can be submitted either in Hindi or in English as the Hindi and English are the official languages of Indian Social Science Congress. As a policy Indian Social Science Academy would like to have all Indian languages as the medium of exchange at ISSC. However, it doesn’t have resources for it. Those who cannot write in Hindi or English are welcome to write in their language. However, they are ex-pected to mail the original text of their papers along with the translated copy either in Hindi or Eng-lish.

Gold Medals

Two Gold Medals, namely, A.K. Tharien Gold Medal and B.V. Rangarao Gold Medal are available for the best papers presented at the XLII Indian Social Science Congress. Two best papers of XLII ISSC adjudged by appropriate committee shall be given Gold Medals at the next session of Indian Social Science Congress in 2019.

Accommodation and Food

All registered delegates of XLII Indian Social Science Congress shall be provided free Guest House/Hostel Accommodation and free food with effect from December 26, 2018 (dinner) to January1, 2019 (breakfast). Accommodation, however, will be available from December 26, 2018 morning. Foreign delegates will be provided accommodation on receipt of intimation well in advance. Those wishing to stay in hotels are advised to make their own arrangements. The Organizing Committee would charge rent for the accommodation prior to December 26 and after December 31, 2018.

All correspondence regarding accommodation should be addressed to the Local Organizing Secre-tary. Filled-in Accommodation And Food Form and Travel Form given in the annexure should be mailed to the Local Organizing Secretary before November 20, 2018..

Transport and Registration

All registered delegates of XLII Indian Social Science Congress will be received at railway station/ airport/bus station at Bhubaneswar.

Kashi Darshan

Bhubaneswar is a beautiful place. Arrangement for visit to beautiful places will be made on De-cember 26, 2018 and January 1, 2019. Delegates desirous of seeing the beautiful and historical places are requested to contact the Organizing Secretary well in advance.

Registration

All those who wish to present their research papers at XLII Indian Social Science Congress are re-quired to get themselves registered by paying the stipulated registration fee. Details of registration fee a as follows:

Category Up to December 20, 2018 From December21, 2018
Member Delegate Rs 3,000.00 Rs 3,500.00
Non-Member Delegate Rs 4,000.00 Rs 4,500.00
Institutional Member Delegate(up to three persons) Rs 10,000.00 Rs 12,500.00
Non Member Institutional Delegate(up to three persons) Rs 15,000.00 Rs 18,500.00
Member Students Delegate Rs 2,000.00 Rs 25,500.00
Non-Member Students Delegate Rs 2,500.00 Rs 3,000.00
Local Delegate Rs 2,000.00 Rs 2,500.00
Foreign Delegates
     From Afro-Asian-Latin American Countries Rs. 5,000.00 Rs. 6,000.00
     From Other Countries(North America and europe) US $ 200.00 US $ 250.00
Accompanying Persons*
     Indian Rs. 2,000.00 Rs. 2,500.00
     Afro-Asian-Latin American Countries Rs. 2,500.00 Rs. 3,000.00
     Other Foreign Countries(North America and europe) US $ 150.00 US $ 200.00

*The word ‘accompanying person’ means wife or husband or child. A child below the age of 6 years shall not be charged for food

One who is not a member but wishes to become member of the Indian Social Science Academy can send the membership fee and the registration fee meant for member-delegate along with filled-in membership and registration forms.

An institution/organization can depute its three or more representatives to the Indian Social Science Congress. In the event of more than three representatives, the cost of registration for individual delegate (member or non-member) shall be payable by the concerned institution/organization.

Unregistered scholars attending XLII Indian Social Science Congress shall be required to buy the food coupon from the counter. No certificate shall be issued to unregistered scholars or scholars who have registered without submitting any papers. No one will be entitled to receive literature of XLII ISSC without registration.

The Registered delegate is entitled to receive kitbags, all publications of the XLII Indian Social Science Congress including its proceedings free of cost, free hostel accommodation, free meals, and free transport from the Guest House/Hostel to the venue of XLII ISSC. The Organizing Committee may provide free or on payment transport from the railway station/airport to the Guest House/Hostel depending upon its resources. However, delegates staying in hotels or on their own shall not be entitled for free transport. Local registered delegates will be entitled for kitbags, free lunch, day tea/coffee and banquets only. Free Breakfast, lunch, day tea and dinner will be available to registered delegates with effect from evening of December 26, 2018 to the morning breakfast of January 1, 2019 only.

The registration fee should be sent to the General Secretary, Indian Social Science Academy by an account payee DD in favour of Indian Social Science Academy payable at Allahabad under registered cover. Outstation cheque or money order will not be entertained. Multicity cheques will be accepted.

Although on the spot registration will be made, yet the Organizing Committee is not bound to pro-vide hostel accommodation to such outstation delegates if the accommodation is not available.

It is, therefore, advisable to get registered within the stipulated time in order to avoid last minutes inconvenience.

The invited scholars and members of the Executive Council, NAAC, Organizing Committee, Re-search Committees, Thematic Panels, Task Force and other bodies and special invitees are advised to pay the registration fee within the stipulated period and act in accordance with advice by the General Secretary, Indian Social Sciences Academy. None is exempted from registration fee. Registration is necessary for enabling the Organizing Committee to arrange accommodation, transport and food for all.

Timely registration and intimation of need for accommodation will facilitate planning for food, accommodation, Transport, Kits, etc.

Refund of the registration fee will be made after deducting 40% as the service charges if the re-quest for it is received before December 10, 2018. Literature of the XLII ISSC, however, shall not be sup-plied in such cases. Those who have registered but are not able to attend the XLII ISSC because of un-avoidable reasons would be supplied all the publications if their request for refund is not received within the stipulated date or if they do not wish refund.

In the event of more than one author of a paper, all will be required to pay the registration fee in-dividually. Co-author of a paper shall not be treated as accompanying person.

Membership

Indian Social Science Congress is open to ISSA members as well non-members. Those who wish to become members of ISSA are advised to post their membership fee along with filled-in membership form to the General Secretary. Such new members shall be eligible for concession in registration fee of XLII ISSC.

Travel Support

All the scholars working in universities, colleges, research institutes, laboratories and R&D organizations shall be expected to seek travel and registration support from their respective organizations. Those who are retired or do not enjoy any institutional support are advised to write to the General Secretary, Indian Social Science Academy before October 15, 2018. All research students in receipt of UGC/CSIR/ICSSR/ICHR/ICPR Fellowships shall meet their travel and registration fee from their contin-gency grants. Such research students who are not receiving any fellowship are advised to write to the Gen-eral Secretary along with ‘bonafide’ and ‘non-receipt of Fellowship’ from their Registrar. Partial or full support will be provided on availability of fund. All Plenary speakers, Chairpersons/Conveners not having institutional support are advised to inform the General Secretary at the earliest.

All requests for travel support will be considered by the appropriate committee and decision will be com-municated by December 15, 2018.

one without paper and without prior commitment by the General Secretary in writing shall be entitled for travel support and on the spot payment of the TA bill is subject to receipt of UGC Grant before December 26, 2018 by Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha.

Programmes

Programs of XLII Indian Social Science Congress shall begin at 0900 a.m. and will continue till 23.00 hours every day. Registration of local delegates will commence on December 25, 2018 and outstation registered delegates on Dec 26, 2018 An outline of programs of XLII ISSC is given inside the cover page. The structure of programs will be as follows:

0800 - Registration
0900-1300 Plenary
1300-1400 Lunch Break
1400-1700 Parallel Sessions
1700-1830 Special/Public Lectures
1830-1900 Free Time
1930-2030 Cultural Programs/Official Meeting
12130-2300 Task Force/Young Scientists Meet/State Social Science Academies

(Those RCs, Thematic Panels/Symposia, Seminars etc needing extra time can hold their sessions during 1900-2030 and 2139-2300 hours)

Inauguration of XLII ISSC will be held between 1000-1200 hrs on December 27, 2018 and the valedictory between 1600-1800 hrs on December 31, 2018.

Printed copies of Programmes will be available to registered delegates with Kits from the registration counter with effect from December 26, 2018. Discount of 40-50% will be available on ISSA publications.

All Research Committees, Thematic Panels and Symposia groups shall meet on December 26, 2018 at 14.30 hrs. at Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha.

Annual Meeting of the General House of the Indian Academy of Social Sciences will be held on December 28, 2018 at 1800 hrs at Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha

Organizing Committee and Executive Council shall meet on December 26, 2018 at 10.00 a.m. at Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha

No Committee/Panel other than Plenary can hold meetings between 0900-1300 hrs.

Certificate

Certificates will be available to the registered delegates with papers from the registration counter with effect from December 31, 2018 noon. All the registered delegates wishing to obtain certificates are re-quested to submit ‘Self-Appraisal Participation Report’ to the registration counter latest by December 30, 2018 at 10.00 a.m.

No certificate will be issued to the registered delegates without papers. Participation without paper by the local scholars is welcome, but no participation certificate will be issued to them.

Although all are expected to stay and participate in the deliberations of XLII Indian Social Science Congress with effect from December 27 to 31, 2018, yet those who wish to leave before because of some urgency are advised to inform the Local Organizing Secretary and the registration counter the date and time of their departure along with their postal addresses in writing. Their certificates will be posted later on.

Whom to contact?

PLEASE MAIL YOUR PAPER, MEMBERSHIP AND REGISTRATION TO THE FOLLOWING:

  • Dr. N.P. Chaubey
  • General Secretary
  • Indian Social Science Academy
  • Iswar Saran Ashram Campus,
  • Allahabad 211004 (U.P.)
  • Email: issaald@gmail.com; Tel: 0532-2544245 (O), 0532-2544570 (R)
  • Website: www.issaindia.in
  • Or
  • Dr. D.M. Diwakar
  • Member-Secretary
  • XLII Indian Social Science Congress
  • Professor & Head of Economics,
  • Former Director,
  • A.N. Sinha Institute of Social Studies,
  • Patna 800001 (Bihar)
  • Email: dmdiwakar@yahoo.co.in
  • Tel: 0612-2219395, M: 09472973336
  • Organizing Secretary
  • Dr Sasmitarani Samanta
  • Organizing Secretary
  • 42nd Indian Social Science Congress
  • Registrar, Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar
  • Email: bbkarfch@kiit.ac.in
  • M: +919437035188; +919937220218
  • Website: www.kiit.ac.in

PLEASE MAIL YOUR FILLED-IN FOOD & ACCOMMODATION FORM AND TRAVEL FORM TO THE FOLLOWING:

  • Joint-Organizing Secretary
  • (i) Dr Bishwavandita Kar
  • Director, KIIT Research Cell
  • Professor in School of Applied Sciences,
  • Dean, School of Yoga
  • Email id: bbkrfch@kiit.ac.in 9937043375
  • Joint-Organizing Secretary
  • Dr Banshidhar Mulia
  • Head, Department of Plastic Surgery
  • KIMS, KIIT University
  • Email id: mailtodrbans@gmail.com
  • Mobile No. +917077927835

PLEASE VISIT WEBSITES: ISSA: www.issaindia.in and Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, Web-site: www.kiit.ac.in

PLEASE CONTACT RESPECTIVE RESEARCH COMMITTEE/THEMTIC PANEL/ SEMINARS/ SYMPOSIA/WORKSHOP/COLLOQUIA CHAIRPERSONS (See Pp 19-31)

First Indian Social Science Congress was held from February 15 to 17, 1976 at Allahabad. Since then it has been held at different universities, details of which are given on p 48. The 40th session of the Indian Social Science Congress was held from December 19-23, 2016 at University of Mysore, Mysuru and the 41st session of it was held from Dec 18 to 22, 2017 at Periyar University, Salem. . Each ISSC has a focal theme, details of which are given on p 48..

All subjects/disciplines of science of Nature-Humans-Society are represented in Indian Social Science Congress. There are 28 Research Committees and 21 Interdisciplinary Thematic Panels in it.

Science in Indian Social Science Congress is defined as social as it is the result of collective mental and physical labour. It is without any boundary and, is indivisible.

University Grants Commission recognizes Indian Social Science Congress on par with Indian Science Congress. Every session of Indian Social Science Congress has a focal theme.

NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON THE ETHICS OF SCIENCE

A DRAFT NOTE

0100 PREAMBLE

The Indian Academy of Social Sciences (ISSA) will hold a National Symposium on The Ethics of Science, with both ethics and science construed in a broad sense. The Symposium has the following aims. (1) To highlight the emerging challenges to society arising from new and developing scientific knowledge, products and practices. These are of increasing consequence to society, but their impact and full implications for the overall well being of society may not be readily comprehensible to an average citizen. (2) To explore how to develop a culture of ethics among scientists as a key societal safeguard in the situation where a few experts guide societal choices of new science and technology. (3) To explore ways to eradicate information poverty about new scientific and technological developments among society at large. This is essential to enable all sections of society to derive equal benefits from science. This would also ensure that science and its applications are used to improve the quality of our material, social, and cultural life, with a better understanding of the longer-term implications of new technologies. Finally, this is the only way to combat the disinformation which accompanies the burgeoning influence of ever new technologies in our life and work.

0200 OBJECTIVES

  1. To conceptualize the quintessential elements of an ethics of science, and their co-evolution with social and cultural values.
  2. To explore the interactive influences between socioeconomic ideologies and ethics of science.
  3. To explore theories of the ethics of science.
  4. To formulate new democratic institutional systems designed to encourage, evaluate, monitor, and regulate the praxis of ethical science
  5. To explore effective ways to evolve an informed, responsible and responsive citizenry as a bulwark against unethical praxis of science.

0300 PERSPECTIVE

With the passage of time, society evolves new values, norms of behaviour and conduct, followed by their integral expression in its laws. The ethics of a society, which could involve both universal as well as relativistic elements, responds to these changes. Thus, while the ethics of a feudal society differ from the ethics of a capitalist society, some attributes, notably those related to privilege, are, to an extent, common to both. Institutionalized science in India, as yet another example, still retains a strong feudalistic element despite its fairly strong interface with international science. The praxis of science is inevitably subject to its societal ambiences, even as it strongly influences the progression of society itself. The social status of those who put their labours to science preferentially influences the science produced by that society. Dominant groups controlling science have been known to arbitrarily influence the directions of new scientific advances according to private or group prejudices and interests, and without caring for its wider or longer-term social implications. Science, and prevailing ethical or unethical practices, both, are played out in the public domain, more intensely interactive than ever before. Thus, greater clarity about the nature of their relationship is imperative and a pre-requisite for designing productive approaches towards sustaining a wholesome nexus between science and society. This is the rationale behind the holding of this symposium

0400 THE CONTEXT

Our society is increasingly driven by new scientific developments and their ever hastened, and therefore often uncritical, applications. Genetically modified organisms, for example, are rapidly invading our ecological and nutritional space even as their potential long-term risks to human health and natural eco-systems remain to be critically examined. Gadgets like the TV, computer, cellphones, cars, even processed food are thus ubiquitous among the middle class today, and often constitute the cherished aspirations of the yet unprivileged. An average citizen spends a good part of the day unquestioningly engaging with one or the other of these. But, even for these widely accepted technologies some of the negative consequences have already reached threatening proportions. Urban pollution, arising from an exponentially increasing use of cars, eventually forced enactments of new regulatory laws, but environmental degradation nevertheless continues. This adversely impacts the ecosystem, and possibly also the earth's climate system. This may have potentially grievous consequences to the stability of agro-meteorological zones in a country like India where rain-fed agriculture is still the mainstay. Insufficient attention was paid to inventing and adopting energy-efficient models of development. Do our decision-makers arrive at informed decisions while acquiring a new technology or promoting an existing one? Do they take a balanced decision in deciding what kind of science needs to be promoted to address the specific problems of society? These problems might include an effective treatment of region-specific endemic diseases, or design of wholesome, conservative waste disposal systems, or availability of safe drinking water to all. Scientists, today, are increasingly under pressure to produce only the sort of science that can be quickly converted into profitable technology, which is often insidiously hyped as contributing to human welfare. However, it is unclear whether every car added to Delhi roads increases the sum total of human happiness. What it unquestionably does is to increase the sum total of profits for the various associated big businesses. Thus, the number of cars continues to increase inexorably while cleaner methods of transport stay neglected. And, all the while, a debate on the longer-term consequences languishes on the margins. Likewise, the Cyber laws, necessitated by the increasing use of computers and the Internet to facilitate on-line business transactions are invasive and potentially disruptive of elementary civil liberties. Yet, most people are unaware of all the civil liberties they lose by the simple act of purchasing a computer and connecting to the Internet. The situation for more controversial technologies, such as stem-cell therapy, are even more complex. Even the lawmakers are not clear about what laws ought to be used to regulate these technologies. They rely on “experts” who may unwittingly or otherwise, push in a number of questionable features into these laws, as has happened with the Cyber laws. There is no question that society needs new science and its innovative applications for a better life for all its citizens. Equally, it needs to ensure transparency in the decision-making process. This requires that “experts” whose opinion is sought, are knowledgeable, critical and honest enough to offer a rigorously considered opinion. Society needs social instruments immunized from overbearing official influences, which would make it possible to question and evaluate the opinions offered, to debate them publicly, and to demand and expect uncompromising accountability. These are some of the topics that the symposium proposes to explore. The context is the ubiquitous pattern common to the processes of technology-infusion into society, often without being authentically examined, and without due regard to their longer-term consequences. When these longer-term consequences become manifest, they are, then, belatedly sought to be controlled, introducing even newer problems. Technologies are often supported by large private enterprises. Since such enterprises are driven by short-term profit, they rarely attempt to comprehensively design or exhaustively analyze emerging technologies. Instead, whatever technologies emerge are hyped as being acquired for the greater good of humanity or the nation, though little may be known about their longer-term fallout: whether of carbon pollution, radioactivity, drug-resistant diseases, nano-pollution or genetic waste. Moreover, power and privilege are used to exploit the widespread illiteracy of the average citizenry to road-roll an inadequately researched technological product or system, by making use of disproportionately influential official positions often feeding on an uncritical media.

The Quality of “Experts” and Science Managers

Acquisition of a new technology is inevitably guided by the opinion of “experts” ( produced behind closed doors) and not by any publicly-debated analysis of the costs and benefits to society. Witness the relentless bureaucratic efforts to dilute the provisions of the Right to Information Act. Most people are scientifically illiterate, and unable to judge the validity of the opinion offered by these “experts”, often obfuscated by public airing of casually offered contrary opinions, or an unsound piece of statistical inference used to justify a new drug. The role of socially-responsive and honest scientists, thus acquires a special significance in such societies. Society ought to get as much clarity on contentious issues as possible, by calling upon imaginative and rigorous minded thinkers to resolve perplexing issues. But, in India, a science manager is typically confounded with a super scientist, particularly endowed with knowledge and wisdom. To the contrary, it is a matter of commonsense that those occupying administrative positions are too involved in mundane administrative matters to have time for a creative and contemplative approach to societal issues. Furthermore, they are rarely so bold as to scrutinize the direction, pace and ethics of the unwieldy institutions they preside over, and end up spraying much untruth about the quality of scientific accomplishments at the numerous ceremonial occasions they appear to avidly dominate. Administrative positions, therefore, tend to correlate inversely with the scientific knowledge and analytical capacity of the individual occupying them. In league with politicians, this leads to a mutually comfortable situation of uncritical co-existence, while trivializing issues of significant social priorities and well-being. Just because science managers in India are often chosen more for their visibility or political initiatives, than for their knowledge and competence, there are several oft-recounted instances of top science managers publicly demonstrating their ignorance of even elementary science, which any school child would be expected to know. But far from being questioned or corrected, they get widely aired by the media and admired by a large group of sycophants. This is of course a piece of the sociology of science in post-independent India, which has not been very successful in shedding a feudal past. But, most regrettably, this has resulted in depriving the nation of the services of the most creative and the talented in academic and scientific institutions. Witness the current unedifying state of Indian scientific and educational institutions (Desiraju, Economic and Political Weekly, May, 2008). The recent case of a top science administrator illustrates some of the dilemmas involved. On the one hand, there is the fact of his numerous foreign trips funded by a foreign organization which probably spent more money on him than the salary paid to him by the government of India. On the other ,there is his “expert” opinion which was so closely aligned to that of the same foreign organization, that it turned out to have been directly plagiarized. (It was on such “expert” opinion that our laws related to intellectual property were to be founded.) Regrettably, unethical scientific practices in India, even in the cases where they have been indubitably proved, are treated by the scientific establishments with indulgence. In most such cases of proven misconduct, the errant scientists have been retained instead of being ostracized out of the scientific enterprise, thereby providing much encouragement to their growing tribe. While Indian society may tolerate corruption in various quarters, in the circumstance of a scientifically illiterate society guided by the decisions of a few experts, this is a very dangerous situation which needs to be corrected on an urgent basis. This can only be done by infusing a culture of ethics. There are other complex issues involved. What should be done in cases which have international ramifications? Institutional mechanisms here suppose bilateral or multilateral cooperation and agreement on ethical issues. However, given the involvement of our own top scientific administrators in unethical and ethically suspect actions, they often lack the credibility or the desire to do anything even in serious cases here. This can be a potential drain on the national investment in R&D, if the fruits can so easily be unethically smuggled abroad, taking advantage of the absence of an institutional mechanism to rectify matters.

Cultural dimension

Tied with the issue of unedifying science management in the country is the neglected cultural dimension. The various new laws that are drafted to address new technological issues are most often just replicas of similar laws in the West. These are rarely assessed for their potential cultural impact. Such assessment, considered necessary today even for a web page, is not considered necessary for our laws, and was not carried out in the case of the recent cyber laws, for instance. This culturally-insensitive approach to legislation, in matters related to science and technology, could prove grievous to society when complex matters such as genetic cloning, call for legislative guidance. The bureaucratic culture of mimesis is unsuited for dealing with innovations, and may create a variety of subtle and non-so-subtle cultural problems. Unhappily, we have simply no fora where issues concerning the interaction of science and culture can be articulated, developed, and discussed. But it is clear that laws regulating technology that are not crafted with vision, foresight and planning to streamline with cultural specificities, eventually lead society through a painful process of maladjustment and much degradation of its cherished values. In summary, society relies increasingly on science and technology. Every new technology has associated with it a complex chain of both intended and unintended consequences. The social value of these technologies, often driven by big business unconcerned with their longer-term consequences, is typically assessed in a scientifically illiterate society by “experts” who may be neither knowledgeable nor honest. Something must be done to ensure at least the latter, possibly by setting up fora to document and monitor ethical norms in scientific research and management. There are precious few such in India, and those that there are, function in a non-transparent way and involve persons with dubious backgrounds who might merely be acting as “fixers”. Given the difficulty of proving ethical violations, this situation provides a free hand for social exploitation of the sort which is disadvantageous to people at large, and puts future generations to serious risk. The Symposium will provide an opportunity to explore a some of the critical issues of ethics that impinge on the relationship between science and society, and the need to sensitize the respective communities in the physical, social and legal sciences to help create an ambience of ethical science in the country.

There are 26 Intradisciplinary Research Committees details of which are given below. Each of these Research Committees strive to appraise, integrate, discover, develop and disseminate current research, theory and methods within them. Research scientists of respective disciplines are welcome to submit and present papers based on research or critical review of research by others in the respective committees. Each of these Research Committee shall also hold symposia/colloquia /lectures on some aspects of the focal theme, “Facing The Challenges Of Modern Civilisation”. Some sub themes have been printed in front of each of the 26 Intradisciplinary Research Committees. These are suggestive and not exhaustive. One is also welcome to write papers on the respective theme of his /her Research Committee.

Young Scientists Division of Indian Social Science Academy (IISA) organizes All India Young Scientist Convention with a view to enabling our young scientists (a) to learn science of Nature-Human-Society, (b) to be creative and innovative and (c) to play creative and meaningful leadership role in self-reliant development rooted in indigenous science and technology for enabling all sections of people of India to enjoy higher ma-terial, social, cultural and spiritual life while living in peace and harmony with nature. The convention provides young scientists opportunity to interact with eminent scientists of diverse disciplines freely and seek guidance on problems on which they are working.

Eighth All India Young Scientist Convention will be held between Dec 27-31, 2018 during the XLII Indian Social Science Congress in Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha. Its deliberations will be focused on the follows issues;

  1. Impact of Digital Technology on Research in Science and Technology.
  2. Status of Funding Research and fellowships.
  3. Status of Infrastructure and Congenial Environment for Research and Technology in Universities and Institutes.
  4. History and Philosophy of Science.
  5. Ethics of Science and Technology
  6. Placement and Utilization of Young Scientists’ Creative Energies .

All those who are enrolled for Doctoral Degrees and are below 35 years, are welcome to present papers and participate in VIII All India Young Scientists Convention. Those who wish to seek guidance from senior eminent scientists on their doctoral works or any other research project are advised to write a brief paper mentioning hypothesis, theory, data, its analysis for a presentation at the Convention. Such papers will be evaluated and selected for presentation at the Convention. Best proposals will be considered for appropriate awards. Those whose proposals are found faulty having weak theoretical and methodological base shall be provided special guidance during and after the Convention.

Young Scientist are also welcome to write substantive analytical papers on ‘Human Future In Digital Era’. Three good papers will be listed for presentation in one of the plenaries on ‘Human Future in Digital Era’. Special guidance through interactive dialogue will be provided to all those whose proposals are found faulty or lacking scientific rigour.

Papers can be written and submitted either in Hindi or English.

Last date for submission of abstracts is Oct 15, 2018 and Nov, 15, 2018 for full papers.

All those who wish to participate in the VIII All Indian Young Scientists Convention are advised to correspond with any of the following:

Prof. Santosh K. Kar
Chairman (Outstation)
Professor
School of Biotechnology
KIIT University
Bhubaneswar 751 024
Email: santoshkariis@rediffmail.com
Mob: 09937085111

Dr. K. Chittibabu
Convener (Outstation)
Assistant Professor, Centre for Study of Labour
School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067
Email: chitti4479@gmail.com
Mob:09013288534

Prof. A. K. Rai
Chairman (Local)
Department of Botany
Banaras Hindu University
Varanasi-221005
Email: akrai.bhu@gmail.com
M: 09450867006

Prof. Surya Pratap Singh
Convener (Local) Professor,
Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University
Varanasi 221 005
Email: suryasingh@hotmail.com
09454734930

One copy of paper should be mailed to the General Sectary, Indian Social Science Academy directly.

Registration fee for the young scientists will be the same as given on p 9 for XLII Indian Social Science Congress, Dec 27-31, 2018.

  • Vice-Chairpersons
    Dr. Kalpana Kannabiran
    Vice-President, Indian Social Science Academy, Director
    Council for Social Development
    5-6-151, Rajendranagar
    Hyderabad 500 030
    Email:kalpana.kannabiran@gmail.com
    M: 09849038920

    2. Prof. V.N. Bhoraskar
    Indian Social Science Academy
    Distinguished Professor
    Department of Physics, S.P. Pune University, Pune 411 007
    Email: vnb@physics.unipune.ac.in
    M: 08805549838
  • Co-Chairman
    Prof. H. Mohanty
    Vice-Chancellor
    KIIT University,
    Bhubaneswar
  • Convener
    Dr. N.P. Chaubey
    General Secretary
    Indian Social Science Academy
    Iswar Saran Ashram Campus, Alla-habad 211004, India
    Tel: 0532-2544245 (O)
    E-mail:issaald@gmail.com
    Website: www.issaindia.in
  • Chairman
    Prof. Binod C Agrawal
    President
    Indian Social Science Academy
    8 ISRO Complex
    Sector D-1 Sterling City
    Ahmedabad 380058
    Bopal, Ahmedabad 380058 Email: agrawal.binod.c@gmail.com
    M: 07573046327

  • Co-Convener
    1. Prof. D.M. Diwakar
    Member-Secretary,Indian Social Science Academy,
    A.N. Sinha In-stitute of Social, Studies
    Patna 800001 (Bihar)
    E-mail:dmdiwakar@yahoo.co.inM: 094720023743

    2. Prof. Baishnab C Tripathy
    President-Elect
    Indian Social Science Academy
    School of Life Sciences
    Jawaharlal Nehru University,
    New Delhi-110067, Email: baishnab-tripathy@yahoo.com
    M: 09818104924

  • Treasurer
    Prof. Harikesh Narain Misra
    Indian Social Science Academy
    Department of Geography
    University of Allahabad
    Allahabad 211 002:
    M: 09415348110, Tel: 0532-2250241
    Email:harry_misra@rediffmail.com


  • Registrar and Organizing Secretary
    Dr. Sasmitarani Samanta
    Registrar, Organizing Secretary
    42nd Indian Social Science Con-gress
    Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology, Bhubaneswar
    Email: drsasmita@gmail.com; registrar@kiit.ac.in
    Mobile: +919437035188; +919937220218
    Website: www.kiit.ac.in


  • MEMBERS
    1. Assadi, Muzaffar (Prof.)
    Department of Political Science
    Mysore University,
    Crawford Hall,
    Mysore 570 005
    Email: muzaffar.assadi@gmail.com

    2. Bapuji, M (Dr.)
    CSIR Scientist (Retd)
    275, Ferns City, Doddanekkondi
    Marathahalli Bangalore 37
    Email: bapujim@gmail.com

    3. Basu, A.K. (Prof.)
    45, Jodhpur Park,
    Kolkata 700 068
    Email: ajoykumar.basu@yahoo.com

    4. Bhattacharya, S.C. (Prof.)
    1-4-D, Club Town Enclave
    20, Chinar Park
    Kolkata 700002 (W.B.)
    Email: sibesh@yahoo.com

    5. Bhushan, Sudhanshu (Prof.)
    National University of Educational
    Planning & Administration
    16-B, Aurobindo Marg
    New Delhi 110016
    Email: bhushan.sudhanshu@gmail.com

    6. Chakravarty, K.K(Dr.)
    President
    Peoples Council of Education
    15-B, Delhi Govt Officers Flat,
    8th Floor, Sector D II
    Vasant Kunjl,
    Near DDA Sports Complex
    New Delhi 110070
    Email: msk4747@yahoo.in

    7. Desiraju, Gautam (Prof.)
    Indian Institute of Science
    Malleswaram,
    Bangalore 560 012
    Email: gautam.desiraju@gmail.com

    8. Devy, G.N. (Dr.)
    Founder Trustee,
    Bhasha Trust,
    Vadodara
    Email: ganesh_devy@yahoo.com

    9. Dhara, Sagar (Dr.)
    D-10, High Rise Apartment
    Lower Tank Bund Road
    Hyderabad 500 080
    E-mail: sagdhara@gmail.com

    10. Elangovan, A (Dr.)
    Professor and Head
    Department of Commerce
    Periyar University,
    Salem 636 011
    Email: puissc2017@gmail.com

    11. Engineer, Meher H. (Prof.)
    Bose Institute of Physics
    93/1, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009
    Email: meheryarengineer@gmail.com

    12. Gaur, Vnod K (Dr.)
    101 Windsor Court,
    17, Millers Road,
    Bangalore 560 046
    Email: gaurvinod36@gmail.com

    13. Goswami, P (Prof.)
    Director
    National Institute of Science Technology
    Development Studies
    (NISTADS), CSIR
    Pusa Gate, K.S. Krishnann Marg
    New Delhi 110012
    E-mail: pgoswami@nistads.res.in

    14. Hegde, B.M. (Prof.)
    “Manjunath”
    Pais Hills, Bejai,
    Mangalore 575004
    Email: hegdebm@gmail.com

    15. Jain, Ashok (Dr.)
    B-527, Sarita Vihar
    New Delhi 110076
    Email: delhiashokjain@yahoo.com

    16. Jal, Murzban (Dr.)
    Director & Professor
    Indian Institute of Education
    128/2 J.P. Nail Path
    Kothrud, Pune-411038 (M.S.)
    E-mail: muzbanjal@hotmail.com,
    iiepune@vsnl.com

    17. Jayavel, R. (Dr.)
    Professor
    Crystal Growth Centre
    Anna University
    Chennai
    Email: rjvel@yahoo.com

    18. Joy, K.J. (Dr.)
    Society For Promoting Participative
    Ecosystem
    Management
    16, Kale Park, Someshwarwadi Road
    Pashan, Pune 411 008
    Email: joykjoy2@gmail.com

    19. Kar, Santosh K. (Prof.)
    School of Biotechnology
    KIIT University
    Bhubaneswar 751 024 (Odisha)
    Email: santoshkariis@rediffmail.com

    20. Kumar, Anand (Prof.)
    President
    Indian Sociological Society
    209 Ayachi Apts.
    Sector-45
    Gurgaon-122002.
    Email: anandkumar1@hotmail.com

    21. Kumar, Krishna (Prof.)
    Department of Applied Botany
    Mangalore University
    Mangalgangothri,
    Mangalore 574199
    E-mail: kkgmane@rediffmail.com,
    kkgtaxo13@gmail.com

    22. Kumar, Sandeep (Prof.)
    Consultant Surgeon
    B 52, J Park, Mahanagar,
    Lucknow 226006
    Email: k_sandeep@hotmail.com; profsandeepsurgeon@gmail.com

    23. Mahulikar, Shripad P. (Prof.)
    Professor
    Aerospace Department,
    IIT, Bombay 400 076
    E-mail: spm@aero.iitb.ac.in

    24. Mallesh, K.S. (Prof.)
    Professor and Chairman
    Department of Physics
    University of Mysore
    Mysuru
    Email: mallesh@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in

    25. Miri, Mrinal (Prof.)
    Chairman
    Indian Council of Philosophical Research
    36, Tughlakabad Institutional Area
    New Delhi 110062
    Email: mirimrinal@hotmail.com;
    chairman@icpr.in

    26. Mittal, Ashok (Prof.)
    Department of Economics
    Aligarh Muslim University
    Aligarh 202002 (U.P.)
    Email: askmittal@yahoo.com

    27. Mukherjee, Asha (Prof.)
    Sonajhuri Palli, Across Canal, Shyambati
    Santiniketan 731235 (W.B.)
    Email: ashamukh@gmail.com

    28. Mukunda, N. (Prof.)
    Vice President
    Indian Academy of Sciences
    CV Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar
    Bangalore 560 080
    E-mail: nmukunda@gmail.com

    29. Nagendraswamy, H.S.N. (Dr.)
    Department of Computer Science
    University of Mysore
    Mysuru
    Email: swamy_hsn@yahoo.com

    30. Nanjundiah, Vidyanand(Prof.)
    Centre for Ecological Science,
    Indian Institute of Science,
    Malleswaram,
    Bangalore 560012 (K.N.)
    Email: vidya@ces.iisc.ernet.in

    31. Panda, Saumya (Dr.)
    Consultant Dermatologist,
    Ashok Swapna,
    122/4, Dr. Jiban Ratan Dhar Road,
    Kolkata 700028 (West Bengal)
    E-mail: saumyapan@gmail.com

    32. Pattanayak, Chandrabhanu (Prof.)
    Director
    Institute of Knowledge Society
    Centurion University
    Bhubaneswar (Odisa)
    E-mail : pattanayakcb@gmail.com

    33. Pattanayak, D.P. (Dr.)
    Janpad-Sampada
    Indira Gandhi National Centre For the Arts
    Janpath, New Delhi – 110001

    34. Palanithurai, G (Prof.)
    Department of Political Science
    Gandhigram Rural Institute, Deemed University
    Gandhigram 624 302 (Tamil Nadu)
    Email: gpalanithurai@gmail.com

    35. Rai, A.K. (Dr.)
    Department of Botany
    Banaras Hindu University,
    Varanasi 221 005 (U.P.)
    Email: akrai.bhu@gmail.com

    36. Rajput, J.S. (Prof.)
    A-16 Sector P-7
    Mitra Enclave (Opp. Greater Valley School)
    Greater Nodia 201 310
    Email: rajput_js@yahoo.co.in

    37. Reddy, O.R. (Prof.)
    Indian Academy of Social Sciences
    Flat No. 1, Shri Lalita Apartment
    Kiralampudi Layout
    Andhra University Gate (Down)
    Visakhapatnam 530 003 (A.P.)
    Email: orreddyvizag@gmail.com

    38. Sangal, Rajeev (Prof.)
    Professor, Computer Sc and Engg And
    Director (Fiormer)
    Indian Institute of Technology
    Banaras Hindu University,
    Varanasi 221 005
    Email:director@iitbhu.ac.in, san-gal@iiit.ac.in

    39. Sarkar, P.K. (Dr.)
    Amader Haspatal
    Phoolberia, Chhatna,
    Bankura 722 136 (West Bengal)
    Email: drpksarkar2010@gmail.com

    40. Sen, Nandini Basu (Ms.)
    45, Jodhpur Park
    Kolkata – 70068
    West Bengal
    Email: nandinisen9@gmail.com

    41. Sharma, C.B.S.R. (Prof.)
    Puducherry
    Email: cbsrsharma42@gmail.com

    42. Sharma, G.D. (Prof.)
    Sector I, Pocket I, Dwarka
    New Delhi 110075
    Email : ganeshdatts@gmail.com,
    seedicf@gmail.com

    43. Sharma, K.S. (Dr.)
    Deputy Director
    Indian Institute of Marxist Theory And
    Practice, Gokul Road
    Hubli 580030 (Karnataka)
    Email: kuvalaya_hubli@rediffmail.com

    44. Sharma, Naresh K. (Dr.)
    Department of Economics
    University of Hyderabad
    Hyderabad 500 046
    Email: na.ku.sharma@gmail.com

    45. Sharma, Shankar (Er.)
    Power Policy Analyst
    1026, 5th Main Road, E&F Block
    Ramakrishna Nagara
    Mysore 570022
    Email: shankar.sharma2005@gmail.com

    46. Shukla, A.P. (Dr.)
    C-4, Nilgiri Apartments
    Karvenagar
    Pune 411 052
    Email: agamp.1935@gmail.com

    47. Singh, R.P. (Prof.)
    D-3/2, Gera’s Emerald
    Baner, Pune 411 045
    Email: singh.prakash.ram@gmail.com

    48. Sinha, Anuj(Er.)
    Plot GH 19, Sector 56
    Gurgaon 122011 (Haryana)
    Email: cpranuj@yahoo.com

    49. Sinha, Yoganand (Prof.)
    Clive Road, Allahabad
    Email: raghusinha@gmail.com

    50. Tilak, Jandhavala B.G (Prof.)
    Former Head
    Department of Educational Finance,
    National University of Educational
    Planning And Administration,
    17-B Sri Aurobindo Marg
    New Delhi 110016
    Email: jtilak2017@gmail.com

    51. Tolpadi, Rajaram (Prof.)
    Head of the Department of Political Science,
    Manglore University,
    Mangalore – 576119, Karnataka
    Email: rtolpadi@rediffmail.com

    52. Trivedi, Upendra (Dr.)
    A 70/1, DDA SFS Flats,
    Saket,New Delhi-110017
    Email: upendra.trivedi@gmail.com

    53. Varman, Rahul (Prof.)
    Indian Institute of Technology
    IIT PO
    Kanpur 208 016 (U.P.)
    Email: rahulv@iitk.ac.in

    54. Verma, S.P. (Prof.)
    President,
    Science For Society, Bihar
    C/o Chemistry Department,
    Science College, Patna University,
    Patna 800005 (Bihar)
    Email: verma1946@yahoo.com

    55. Yadav, P.K (Prof.)
    Visiting Professor
    NationaL Institute of Science Education &
    Research
    Berhampur (Odisha)
    Email: pkyadava1953@gmail.com

    56. Yadav, Raja Ram (Dr.)
    Vice-Chancellor
    Veer Bahadur Purvanchal University
    Jaunpur (U.P.)
    Email: rryadav1@rediffmail.com

The Indian Social Science Academy (ISSA when abbreviated) is the first National Science Academy of independent Democratic Republic of India and fourth in chronicle order. The other three National Science Academies―Indian National Science Academy (INSA), Indian Academy of Sciences (IAS) and National Science Academy of India (NSAI) were born in British India. ISSA was born, 44 years ago, on August 15, 1974 at University of Allahabad in an assembly of young scientists. August 15, 1974 symbolized a begin-ning of an altogether new science reflecting democratic needs, aspirations, creative urges / potentialities, history, culture and traditions of peoples of India. Its name was carefully chosen for reflecting the true meaning and function of science. The setting up of the Indian Social Science Academy also heralded a be-ginning of a new movement for unity of science of Nature-Humans-Society by forging unity among all branches of science. Many described it as a barometer of science and society in India. In more than one sense ISSA is a unique body in the whole world.

Science means objective knowledge of non-living and living things / objects and knowledge means answer to questions ‘what’, ‘how’ and ‘why’, about a thing / object. The word ‘Nature’ connotes all forms of objects / things / matter including humans and societies. Nature-Humans-Society form one single continuum. So division of science into physics, chemistry, biology, environment, ecology, agriculture, medical, social, historical etc., is artificial and all such divisions provide partial objective knowledge of Nature-Humans-Society. Unity of Science of Nature-Humans-Society, therefore, is necessary for having correct and full understanding of Nature. Science. Science, thus, viewed is unitary as well as uniting.

The Science as an objective knowledge of non-living and living objects / things / matter is produced through collective mental and physical labour of men and women. What is the result of collective labour is termed as social and what is social is public and not private. Science, therefore, is social. It springs in society comprising men and women. Because it is social it has social functions. It has the prime role in enabling men and women to enjoy higher quality of material, social and cultural life in harmony with Nature. However, all such social functions of science filter through different groups in the society because of which one doesn’t find one-to-one relationship between science and conditions of all men and women of all societies. Humans’ inability to create a science-based society is well reflected in modern societies all over the world.

The Indian Social Science Academy seeks to discover, develop and disseminate science of Nature-Humans-Society in Indian conditions in particular, and world conditions in general, with a mission to build a new Democratic Republic of India where there is no hunger, no poverty, no unemployment, no illiteracy, no disease, no bigotry, no superstitions, no communalism, no casteism and no discrimination of any form and where all men, women and children enjoy equally good quality of material, social, cultural and spiritual life in harmony with Nature without any kind of fear of violence, rape and murder.

Founders of the Indian Social Science Academy thought that science can benefit the peoples of a given society only when it is taught and researched in their own language. Communication of scientific research and science education in people’s own language, therefore, is key to the unfolding of creative potentialities of peoples and benefiting them. Unfortunately, even after 70 years of independence science in India is communicated through English. The end result is peoples of India who fund all scientific research are deprived of its benefits. The creativity in science is continuously declining. The Indian Social Science Academy., therefore, seeks to change it by creating necessary conditions for communication of scientific research and science education in Indian languages involving publication of research journals, monographs, books, etc., in Indian languages.

All branches of science as mentioned below constitute the Indian Social Science Academy:

  1. 1. Agricultural Science
  2. Anthropology
  3. Biological or Life Science
  4. Biotechnology
  5. Communication And Journalism
  6. Commerce
  7. Computer Science And Information Technology
  8. Defence And Strategic Studies
  9. Ecological And Environmental Science
  10. Economics
  11. Education
  12. Engineering Science
  13. Geography
  14. Earth Science, Atmospheric Science, Ocean Science And Planetary Science
  15. History And Archaeology
  16. Home Science
  17. International Relations Studies
  18. Juridical Science
  19. Linguistics
  20. Management Science
  21. Mathematics And Statistics
  22. Medical And Health Science
  23. Philosophy
  24. Physical Science
  25. Chemical Science
  26. Political Science
  27. Population Science
  28. Psychology
  29. Social Work
  30. Sociology

Besides, policy planners, development agents and social activists having concern for science-based pursuits also find welcome place in the Indian Social Science Academy. Thus the Indian Social Science Academy is all embracing and all encompassing within the framework of science.

The Indian Social Science Academy pursues the following activities for realizing its goal:

  1. 1. Indian Social Science Congress
  2. Network of State Centres / State level Academies
  3. State level Social Science Congress in languages of respective States
  4. Research and Training Centres
    1. (I) Rural Development Centres
    2. Survey Research Centres
    3. ISSA Silver Jubilee Peoples Science Centre for Theoretical and Policy Research
  5. Research Journals and Newsletters
    1. (I) Bharatiya Samajik Chintan (English)
    2. Samayik Samajik Chintan (Hindi)
    3. ISSA Newsletter
  6. Young Scientist Division
  7. All India Young Scientists Convention
  8. Publication of Books / Monographs in Indian Languages
  9. Communication of Science to the People
  10. Science Library
  11. Local / regional / national / international seminars / symposia / colloquia / public lectures / Group discussions
  12. Networking with universities, colleges, research institutes, agriculture and industries

What stands in the way of realization of full potentiality of ISSA is the paucity of financial resources and appropriate infrastructure.

SI. No. Name of President Place Subject Year
1. Prof. A.D. Sharma Allahabad Economics 1974-75
2. Prof. R.L. Singh (Late) Varanasi Geography 1976-77
3. Prof. A.D. Pant (Late) Allahabad Political Science 1977-78
4. Prof. B.K. Roy Burman (Late) New Delhi Anthropology 1978-79
5. Prof. R.P. Dhokalia New Delhi Juridical Science 1979-80
6. Prof. S.P. Dasgupta (Late) Calcutta Geography 1980-81
7. Prof. Shib K. Mitra (Late) New Delhi Psychology 1981-82
8. Prof. Gautam Mathur (Late) New Delhi Economics 1982-83
9. Prof. Ravinder Kumar (Late) New Delhi History 1983-84
10. Prof. Ramkrishna Mukherjee Calcutta Sociology 1984-85
11. Prof. Yogendra Singh New Delhi Sociology 1985-86
12. Prof. V.K.R.V. Rao (Late) Bangalore Economics 1986-87
13. Prof. M.S. Gore (Late) Mumbai Sociology 1987-88
14. Prof. B.M. Udgaonkar (Late) Mumbai Physics 1988-89
15. Prof. D.P. Pattanayak Bhubaneswar Linguistics 1989-90
16. Prof. Upendra Baxi New Delhi Juridical Science 1990-91
17. Prof. B.L. Amla Mysore Biology 1991-92
18. Prof. P.M. Bhargava Hyderabad Chemistry 1992-93
19. Dr. K.S. Singh (Late) Ranchi Anthropology 1993-94
20. Prof. A. Rahman (Late) New Delhi Physics 1994-95
21. Dr. Basanta Sarkar (Late) Hyderabad Electrical Engineering 1995-96
22. Prof. K. Raghavendra Rao Dharwad Political Science 1996-97
23. Dr. Upendra Trivedi New Delhi Physics 1997-98
24. Prof. S.C. Bhattacharya Allahabad History 1998-99
25. Prof. G.C. Pande (Late) Allahabad History 1999-2000
26. Prof. G.D. Sharma New Delhi Education 2000 -2001
27. Prof. Rajammal P. Devadas (Late) Coimbatore Home Science 2001-2002
28. Prof. K. Wilson Hyderabad Philosophy 2002-2003
29. Prof. K.H. Cheluva Raju (Late) Bangalore Political Science 2003-2004
30. Dr. A. K. Tharien (Late) Dindigul Medical Science 2004-2005
31. Prof. M. G. S. Narayanan Calicut History 2005-2006
32. Prof. N. Markandan Coimbatore Political Science 2006-2007
33. Dr. Bhalchandra Mungekar New Delhi Economics 2007-2008
34. Sri S.P. Shukla New Delhi Administration 2008-2009
35. Prof. Meher H. Engineer Kolkata Physics 2009-2010
36. Prof. Vinod K. Gaur Bangalore Earth Science 2010-2011
37. Dr. T. Karunakaran Wardha Engineering Science 2011-2012
38. Prof. Santosh K. Kar New Delhi Biotechnology 2012-2013
39. Prof. P.S. Ramakrishnan New Delhi Ecological and Environmental Science 2013-2014
40. Prof. R.P. Singh Pune Physics 2014-2015
41. Prof. R.C. Tripathi Allahabad Psychology 2015-2016
42. Prof. B.M. Hegde Mangalore Medical Science 2016-2017
43. Prof. K.S. Sharma Hubli Political Science 2017-2018
44. Prof. Binod C. Agrawal Ahmedabad Anthropology 2018-2019
45. Prof.. Baishnab C. Tripathy New Delhi Life Science 2019-2020
Session Focal Theme Venue Year
1. Issues in Social Research in India Allahabad 1976
2. Problems of Development of Small Towns Varanasi 1977
3. Accelerating Rural Development Kanpur 1978
4. Social Science of Society of Future Santiniketan 1979
5. Impact of Science & Technology on Indian Society Udaipur 1980
6. Social Perspective of Development of Science & Technology in India Kanpur 1981
7. National Integration and Development of India New Delhi 1982
8. Strategies of India's Development Hyderabad 1983
9. State & Society in India Aligarh 1984
10. Social Structure of Society in India Allahabad 1985
11. Challenges of Transformation of Society and Culture in India Mumbai 1986
12. Indian Society at the Turn of the Century: Objectives & Strategies Mysore 1987
13. Social Implications of Development: The Asian Experience New Delhi 1988
14. Planning for India's Development: The Vision, The Challenges & Implementation Ahmedabad 1989
15. Society, Language & Development: Indian Context Berhampur 1990
16. Decay & Destruction Today: Social Reality and Social Theory Pune 1991
17. Creativity, Technology, Productivity & Justice: The Indian Context Bangalore 1993
18. Knowledge for New World Order Vadodara 1994
19. People of India Allahabad 1996
20. Fifty Years of Freedom of India: State, Nation and People Santiniketan 1996-97
21. Peoples' Technology And Social Organisation in Action Thanjavur 1997
22. Democracy, Peoples', Development And Culture: The Emerging Challenges And Initiatives Gandhigram 1998
23. Social Change: The Initiatives and Intervention Coimbatore 1999
24. Perspective of Development of India In The Twenty First Century Chandigarh 2000
25. The Emerging Challenges of Globalisation And Food Security In The Twenty First Century Thiruvanathapuram 2001
26. Power, Violence And Society Visakhapatanam 2002
27. The Challenges To Democracy In India: From Critique to Construction Kharagpur 2003
28. The Crisis of Modern Civilisation Gandhigram 2005
29. Facing The Challenges of Modern Civilisation Lucknow 2005
30. Towards A New Global Society Kraikudi 2006
31. Peoples’ Struggles And Movements for Equitable Society Mumbai 2007
32. The Indian Republic At The Crossroads New Delhi 2008
33. Our Planet In Crisis Hyderabad 2010
34. India-Post 1991 Guwahati 2010
35. Working For Peaceful Co-Existence And A Just World Science, Society And The Planet Earth Wardha 2011
36. Building An Ecologically Sustainable Society Bhubaneswar 2012
37. Knowledge Systems, Scientific Temper and The Indian People Emerging Interfaces of Social Science and Public Policy in India Visakhapatnam 2015
38. Peoples’ Health and Quality of Life In India Mysore 2016
39. Indian University Education System: A Critical Appraisal Salem 2017
40. Human Future in Digital Era Varanasi 2018
  • Councillor
    Dr. N. Sambasiva Rao
    Professor, Department of Commerce & Management Studies
    Andhra University,
    Visakhapatnam (A.P.)- 530003
    Email: auissc2015@gmail.com
    M: 09848170274

    Dr. N. Sambasiva Rao
    Professor, Department of Commerce & Management Studies
    Andhra University,
    Visakhapatnam (A.P.)- 530003
    Email: auissc2015@gmail.com
    M: 09848170274

    Prof Saumen Chattopadhaya
    Zakir Husain Centre For Educational Stu-dies,
    School of Social Sciences
    Jawaharlal Nehru University
    New Delhi 110067
    Email: schatto@gmail.com
    09873439840

    Dr. Raja Ram Yadav
    Vice Chancellor
    Veer Bahadur Singh Poorvanchal Universi-ty
    Jaunpur (U.P.)
    Email: rryadav1@rediffmail.com
    M : 9415347913

    Prof. Asha Mukherjee
    Sonajhvri Palli, Across Canal, Shyambati
    Santiniketan 731235 (W.B.)
    Email: ashamukh@gmail.com
    M: 09434744589

    Dr. Varada M. Nikalje
    Asst Prof. (English)
    Department of Elementary Education
    National Council of Educational Research & Training (NCERT), New Delhi 110016
    Email: vmnikalje@gmail.com
    M: 09868656411

    Dr. Mohammad Nayim
    Department of Social work
    Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Institute of Social Sciences,
    Bundelkhand University
    Jhansi 284 128
    Email: mohdnayim00@gmail.com
    M: 09415925223

    Dr. Deepak Kumar Bose
    Associate Professor
    Department of Agricultural Extension and Communication
    Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology and Sciences,
    Deemed University,Allahabad 211007 (U.P.)
    Email: dipak.bose@shiats.edu.in

    Dr. Keshab Das
    Gujarat Institute of Development Research Centre
    B-33, Century Bodakdev
    Ahmedabad 380 054 (Gujarat)
    Email: keshabdas@gmail.com
    M: 09427527884

    Dr. Binod Kumar Jha
    Associate Professor
    Department of Political Science
    A.N.S. College, Barh 803 213
    Email: bkjpatna@gmail.com
    M: 09709738747

    Dr. Biswabandita Kar
    Professor
    School of Biotechnology
    KIIT University
    Room No. 605, D Block, 6th floor
    Campus-3 KIIT University
    Bhubaneswar 751 0245 (Orissa0
    Email: bbkarfch@kiit.ac.in
    M: 09937043375

    Prof. Sandeep Kumar
    HIG – 111, Sector – E
    Aliganj
    Lucknow – 226024Uttar Pradesh
    Email: profsandeepsurgeon@gmail.com
    M: 09335240880

    Prof. Anand Kumar
    209 Ayachi Apts.
    Sector-45
    Gurgaon-122002. (Haryana)
    Email: anandkumar1@hotmail.com
    M: 09650944604

    Dr. Gordhan Lal Malav
    Lecturer in Selection Grade,
    P.G. Department of Economics,
    Government College,
    Kota 324001 (Rajasthan)
    Email: glmalav@yahoo.in
    M: 09414182525

    Dr. Harsha Merchant
    Principal
    Aishabai College of Education
    Byculla, Mumbai
    Email: harsha_merchant@yahoo.co.in
    M: 09969020706

    Residence:
    13/A, Suvarna Kalesh CHS
    49/52 Tarun Bharat Soc.
    Chakala, Andheri East
    Mumbai 400 099

    Dr. Mani Ram Singh
    Assistant Professor
    State Takmeel ut Tim College
    and Hospital, Abdul Aziz Road
    Chaupatiya, Lucknow (U.P.) – 226 003
    Email: dr_maniramsingh@rediffmail.com
    M: 08765402145

    Prof. Rahul Varman
    Indian Institute of Technology
    IIT PO
    Kanpur 208 016 (U.P.)
    Email: rahulv@iitk.ac.in
    M: 09450226499

    Prof. G.K. Rai
    74/77, Dilkusha Park
    New Katra,
    Allahabad 211002
    Email: raigyanendra@gmail.com
    M: 09415215881

    Dr. Bansidhar Mulia
    Head
    Department of Plastic Surgery
    Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences
    Patia
    Bhubaneswar 751024
    Email: mailtodrbans@gmail.com
    M: 07077927835

    Dr. Lal Babu Yadav
    Department of Political Science,
    Jai Prakash Vishvidyalaya,
    Chhapra 831301 (BIHAR)
    Email: lbyjpu@gmail.com
    M: 09415356289

    Dr. Chandrakant Yatanoor
    Professor and Chairman
    Department of Post-Graduate Studies
    And Research in Political Science,
    Gulbarga University,
    Gulbarga-585 106
    Karnataka
    Email: cmyatanoor@rediffmail.com

  • Vice-President
    Dr. Kalpana Kannabiran
    Professor & Director
    Council for Social Development
    Hyderabad
    Email: kalpana.kannabiran@gmail.com
    M: 09849038920
    040-24016395 (O)
    27733853 (R)
    Residence:
    128, Hanuman Temple Road
    East, Merradpalli
    Secunderabad 500 002
  • Treasurer
    Dr. Harikesh Narain Misra
    Department of Geography
    University of Allahabad
    Allahabad 211 002
    harry_misra@rediffmail.com
    M: 09415348110
  • President-elect
    Prof. Baishnab Charan Tripathy
    School of Life Sciences
    Jawaharlal Nehru University,
    New Delhi-110067
    Email: baishnabtripathy@yahoo.com
    M: 09818104924
  • President
    Dr Binod C Agrawal
    8 ISRO Complex
    Sector D-1 Sterling City
    Bopal, Ahmedabad 380058
    Email: agrawal.binod.c@gmail.com
    M: 07573046327
  • Immediate Past-President
    Dr K.S. Sharma
    Deputy Director
    Indian Institute of Marxist Theory & Prac-tice,
    Gokul Road, Hubli 580030 (Karnataka)
    Email: kuvalaya_hubli@rediffmail.com
    M: 099876801909
  • Vice-President
    Prof. V.N. Bhoraskar
    Distinguished Professor
    Department of Physics
    S.P. Pune Univearsity,
    Pune 411 007
    Email: vnb@physics.unipune.ac.in
    M: 08805549838
  • General Secretary
    Dr. N.P. Chaubey
    General Secretary
    Indian Social Science Academy,
    Iswar Saran Ashram Campus,
    Allahabad 211 004
    Email: issaald@gmail.com
    0532-2544245 (O)
    2544570 (R)
    M: 6389225222
  • Joint Secretary
    Dr. Shivappa Ramakrishna
    Associate Professor & Chairman
    Dept of Studies in Social Work and
    Chairman – Board of Studies in Social Work
    University of Mysore, Manasgangothri
    Mysuru 570006
    Email: shivappar@gmail.com

    Dr. G. Shankar
    Government Teachers’ Education College
    Khagaria, Pipra Road Dumri P.O.
    Begusarai 851117 (Bihar)
    Email: g_shankar_2007@yahoo.co.in

    Dr. Sima Baidya
    Assistant Professor
    Centre for West Asian Studies
    Jawaharlal Nehru University
    New Delhi 110067
    Email: sima.baidya@gmail.com

    Dr. Kali Chittibabu
    Assistant Professor
    Centre for Informal Sector and Labour Stu-dies
    School of Social Sciences 1
    Jawaharlal Nehru University
    New Delhi110067
    Email: chitti4479@gmail.com

  • Ex-Officio
    Prof. Achyut Samanta
    Founder
    KIIT University
    Bhubaneswar

    Prof. H. Mohanty
    Vice-Chancellor
    KIIT University
    Bhubaneswar

    Dr. Sasmita Samanta
    Registrar
    KIIT University
    Organizing Secretary
    XLII Indian Social Science Congress
S.No. Title Type Price
1. Rediscovering Marxism of Karl Marx by Randhir Singh Paperback 30.00
2. Secularism in India by MS Gore (Ed) Deluxe 200.00
Paperback 130.00
3. Social Justice and Social Process in India by N.R. Madhav Menon (Ed) Deluxe 250.00
Paperback 150.00
4. Social Implications of Development: The Asian Experience by MS Gore, G. Pant and N.P. Chaubey Deluxe 180.00
Paperback 120.00
5. Indian Society at the Turn of the Century by N.P. Chaubey (Ed)   200.00
6. The Myth of Planned Development by E. Haribabu, B. Sarkar and N.P. Chaubey (Eds) Deluxe 230.00
Paperback 130.00
7. Regional Planning and Development   10.00
8. Imperatives of Democratic Planning in India by Ranjit Sau Paperback 20.00
9. Impact of Science and Technology on Indian Society by S.N. Ghosh & N.P. Chaubey (Eds)   80.00
10. Social Perspective of Development of Science and Technology in India by B.V. Rangarao & N.P. Chaubey (Eds)   100.00
11. Tribal Techniques, Social Organisations and Development: Disruption and Alternates by N.P. Chaubey (Ed)   100.00
12. Social Perspective of Generation and Utilization of Indigenous Science and Technology by B. Sarkar, M.A. Qureshi and N.P. Chaubey(Eds) Deluxe 160.00
Paperback 100.00
13. Social Perspective in Microprocessors and Information Technology by R. Sadananda and B. Sarkar (Eds) Deluxe 75.00
Paperback 50.00
14. Deprivation And Human Personality: Current Theory and Research by L.P. Pandey,Rajni Patni and N.P. Chaubey Deluxe 250.00
Paperback 200.00
15. Knowledge for New World Order by B. Sarkar Individua 30.00
Library 50.00
16. Fifty Years of Freedom of India: State, Nation and People by K Raghavendra Rao, Asok K. Maiti, D. Panda and N.P. Chaubey (Eds) Deluxe 250.00
Paperback 100.00
17. Terrorism, State Terrorism and Democratic Rights by Randhir Singh Member 15.00
Nonmember 20.00
Library 25.00
18. Social Cost of Bonded Labour by U.P. Arora, M.K. Patra, Ramshankar and N.P. Chaubey   20.00
19. Nurturants of Bonded Labour by U.P. Arora, M.K. Patra, Ramshankar and N.P. Chaubey   10.00
20. Democracy, Peoples' Development And Culture: The Emerging Challenges And Iniatives by D. Panda and N.P. Chaubey Deluxe 350.00
Paperback 150.00
21. Population Change And Rural Development Paperback 100.00
22. Emerging International Order And Foreign Policy options For India by P.M. Kamath (Ed.) Deluxe 260.00
Paperback 150.00
23. Education and Family Welfare Planning By B. N. Sarkar Deluxe 410.00
24. Social Science Abstracts (Yearly Publication)* Individual 300.00
Library 400.00
25. Bharatiya Samajik Chintan (Quarterly Journal in English)** Library 300.00
Individual 200.00
Foreign $80.00
26. Samayik Samajik Chintan (Quarterly Journal in Hindi) Library 250.00
Individual 200.00
Foreign $80.00
27. Towards Health-Care For All : Some Key Issues by Dr. Anant Phadke Library 45.00
Individual 20.00
28. Indian Human Development In A Nation by Ranjit Sahu Library 30.00
Individual 15.00
29. Indian Human Development In A Nation by Ranjit Sahu Paperback 120.00
Deluxe 250.00
30. Sociology And Politics of Health For All In India by D. Banerji Library 25.00
Individual 15.00
31. Evolution of India’s Health Policy 1947-2001: An Appraisal by Saumya Panda Library 30.00
Individual 20.00
32. Facing The Challenges of Globalisation by S.N. Ghosh Library 30.00
Individual 20.00
33. Elephant In The Mirror By H.M. Marulasiddaiah Library 30.00
Individual 20.00
34. Impediments To Social Change In India by D. Panda Library 50.00
Individual 30.00
35. ISSA and the Rural Youth (English & Telugu) by Dr. N.P. Chaubey   15.00
36. Political Economy of (Breast) Cancer by Sthabir Dasgupta Paperback 50.00
Deluxe 80.00
37. The Tragic Partition of Bengal by Suniti Kumar Ghosh Paperback 200.00
Deluxe 350.00
38. Globalisation, Democracy And Third World (in Bengal), Vol. I & Vol. II    
39. Constructing An Identity: Forging Hindusim Into Harappan Religions By K. M. Shrimali Individual 50.00
Library 90.00
40. On Ethics of Violence by D Panda Paperback 25.00
41. Crisis of Civilisation, Vol. I By N. P. Chaubey and D. Panda Paperback 100.00
Deluxe 200.00
42. Trend Report of XXVIII Indian Social Science Congress    
43. Proceedings of XXVIII Indian Social Science Congress    
44. Presidential Address to XXVIII ISSC by A. K. Tharien    
45. Toward A New Global Society (Presidential Address to XXX ISSC by N. Markandan)    
46. Inaugural Speech to XXXI ISSC by Bhalchandra Mungekar    
47. Proceedings of The XXXII Indian Social Science Congress    
48. Tuning The Media To Science And The New Democratic Global Society (In Press)    
49. Peoples Struggles And Movements For Equitable Society Paperback 700.00
Deluxe 1500.00
50. Special Economic Zones: Economic And Social Perspective (In Press)    
51. {Planet Earth: Peoples, Society And Science (In Press) Paperback 200.00
Deluxe 400.00
52. The Indian Republic At The Crossroads By S.P. Shukla and K.S. Sharma Paperback 300.00
Deluxe 400.00
53. The Indian Republic At The Cross Road: In In Search of Radical And Inclusive Politics by S.P. Shukla   20,00
54. Our Planet In Crisis (In Press)    
55. Our Planet In Crisis: Presidential Address by Meher H. Engineer   20,00
56. Towards A Just Egalitarian Cooperative Social Order XXXV ISSA by Sulabha Brahme   20,00
57. Grounds For Hope by Ramrkishna Bhattacharya Paperback 20,00
58. Our Planet In Crisis by Meher H. Engineer Paperback 20,00
59. Proceedings of XXXV Indian Social Science Congress    
60. Proceedings of XXXVI Indian Social Science Congress    
61. Proceedings of XXXVII Indian Social Science Congress    
62. Proceedings of XXXVIII Indian Social Science Congress    
63. Proceedings of XXXIX Indian Social Science Congress    
64. Building An Ecologically Sustainable Society (In Press)    
65. Knowledge Systems, Scientific Temper And the Indian People (In Press)    
66. Financing of Universities: State Vs Private (In Press)    
67. Emerging Interfaces of Social Science And Public Policy in India Paperback 700.00
Deluxe 1,100.00
68. Presidential Address – Science Need To Be Set Free For The Good of Mankind by Prof. B.M. Hegde Paperback 25.00
69. Indian University Education System (In Press)    
70. Social Science Abstracts, Vol XLI, 2017 Paperback 700.00
71. Bharatiya Samajik Chintan (A Quarterly Theortic Research Journal)